Update on Nepal Politics: Maoist Drama and Election Schedule

election_program_1.jpg ब्लगमान्डू: संविधान सभा चुनावका लागि शर्त राख्दै माओवादीले गरेको अपील

Click on the pic to see the poll Schedule 1 and here is Schedule 2

This and the past week are witnessing interesting developments on the political front. The Maoist drama and its confusing and contradictory statements regarding elections have overshadowed the past several days. Amid all the uncertainties the election commission publicized the schedule of the Constituent Assembly polls that has helped to propel the election electin politics to new height. Then one UN honcho says he thinks elections are possible on November 22 which is also a matter of satisfaction. Also comes the news that the cabinet on Monday (20 Aug) has decided to nationalize within 15 days the property of the late King Birendra and his family and property inherited by King Gyanendra. Decided? Didn’t the government decide to do the same months ago? Still better to be optimistic and we are thiking positive. Here is the roundup of key headlines (and leads) of the past few days just in case if you have missed them:

Maoist U-turns on poll pre-conditions continue

KATHMANDU, Aug 20- The CPN Maoist renewed its call for a republic and a proportional election system as pre-conditions for the Constituent Assembly (CA) polls. However, in an ironic twist, Maoist Chairman Prachanda has issued a press statement floating a 22-point pre-requirement proposal to “ensure” that the CA polls are held on November 22. Prachanda has warned of strong protests including ‘people’s action’, ‘political’ strikes and public meetings in case there is no action on the 22-point proposal. The two Maoist pre-conditions – declaration of a republic before going for elections and a proportional election system – are not new and were incidentally already decided upon by an eight-party meet long ago. The EPA had decided in favor of a mixed election system and finalizing the fate of the monarchy at the fist meeting of the constituent assembly. (continue reading this article here or click on More read rest of this blog post)

Royal property to be nationalized in 15 days

By Yuvraj Acharya
KATHMANDU, Aug 20- The cabinet meeting held Monday after a long gap decided to nationalize within 15 days the property of the late King Birendra and his family and property inherited by King Gyanendra. The government will nationalize forests, parks, palaces and farmland owned by the royal family, except for King Gyanendra’s personal property. The meeting formed a five-member committee headed by Home Minister Krishna Prasad Sitaula to accomplish the task of royal property nationalization. The committee includes Forest and Soil Conservation Minister Dev Gurung, Culture, Tourism and Civil Aviation Minister Prithvi Subba Gurung, Law and Parliamentary Affairs Minister Narendra Bikram Nembang and Physical Planning and Construction Minister Hisila Yami. (continue reading)

Q & A With Maoist Chairman Prachanda

Q. What will be the status of the Koirala government if, in case, the elections don’t take place?

Prachanda: There won’t be the Koirala government if elections don’t take place. Not only will Koirala’s government go, the country will face a huge disaster.

Q. What kind of disaster?

Prachanda: The country will be caught in a complex civil war if the CA polls are not held in proper manner.

Q. Civil war?

Prachanda: Yes, a civil war. The series of events have shown that. At that time the scale of international forces’ intervention will be very large. Many people even indicate Nepal’s fate as that of Afghanistan and Iraq. But not Iraq or Afghanistan, Nepal could turn into a Vietnam of the 21st century. This means, there is a possibility that the Nepali people will once again have to revolt against international intervention. What I believe is, if the peace process does not move forward in a proper manner, yet another people’s revolt is a must.

Q. Are you in a position to organize that sort of people’s revolt?

Prachanda: The people of Nepal have to do that. We, on our part, could of course try to lead the revolt.

Q. But, how much possibility is there of deferring the polls to Baisakh (mid-April to mid-May) through an agreement by amending the constitution?

Prachanda: I don’t think so. It does not happen every time. There won’t be any situation where the Nepali people will tolerate the postponement of polls time and again.

Q. That means, if polls don’t happen in November, there is no possibility of polls at all in the near future?

Prachanda: I think it won’t be wrong to draw such a conclusion.

Q. For what the people’s revolt you are talking about?

Prachanda: Firstly, it is for holding of the polls. If that could not happen, it is for transferring all the power to the people.

Q. Power in the people’s hands means power in your hands?

Prachanda: Power in our hands means power in the hands of those who represent the people

Q. When are you launching your people’s revolt?

Prachanda: The process has already begun. Our comrades who are ministers have outlined certain points and given an ultimatum to quit the government if those points are not met. This itself is the beginning of the revolt.

Q. What will be the eight-party equation if the elections do not take place?

Prachanda: I doubt that the coalition will remain intact if the elections do not take place. Either the eight parties will again launch a fresh movement or some of the parties will join hands with the reactionary forces and some will reach out to the people.

Q. What will be the role of the PLA in the revolt?

Prachanda: The PLA cannot be used in course of the people’s movement. But, anything can happen if a situation arises wherein the country heads towards the people’s revolt. The PLA may not remain inside the ‘cantonments’. It will come out.

Q. What will happen to the UN monitoring/ supervision process if the election does not take place on the scheduled date?

Prachanda: The agreement was for nearly one year. If the election does not take place within that period then the UN’s role would come to an end. There will be no need of the UN to stay here. (continue reading)

EC releases CA election schedule

Schedule 1 and Schedule 2

KATHMANDU, Aug 19 – The Election Commission (EC) on Sunday made public the election schedule for first-past-the-post (FPTP), as well as proportional electoral (parallel) systems for Constituent Assembly election. All candidates who wish to contest for the 240 seats in FPTP should file nominations at the respective District Election Offices on October 5 from 10:00 am to 5 pm. The election office will publish the final name list of candidates on October 10 and provide election symbols on October 11. Thereafter, each candidate will be able to campaign for 39 days. However, EC has given only 17 campaigning days for candidates for the 240 seats in the parallel system. According to EC, political parties should submit a closed list of their candidates at the EC on September 30 from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm. (continue reading)

‘Security good to hold Nov polls’

KATHMANDU, Aug 19 – At a time when some political parties are hinting at deferring the Constituent Assembly elections again by raising the bogey of deteriorating security situation, a top UN official on Sunday gave the thumbs up to the security situation here. “At this point we think elections can be carried out quite fairly, that people will feel secure, and that in the end the result will reflect the will of the Nepalese people,” said B Lynn Pascoe, UN under-secretary- general for Political Affairs (the head of the UN Department of Political Affairs) at a press conference at the Tribhuvan International Airport before his departure. “That’s our goal.” (continue reading)

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148 thoughts on “Update on Nepal Politics: Maoist Drama and Election Schedule

  1. all the clowns in the circus dont know wat their next step is…..some say CA, some say ladders must be set to climb upto CA, some say, some others clowns say we’ll break ur legs if u try to reach CA….all the clowns are either confused or drugged by foreign clowns to do what they desire…..GOD when will the clowns take off their sorry outfit and become normal human beings????

  2. What has the SPAM government done since it came to power except give more misery to the people and empty the state coffers of a bankrupt nation? The ailing economy continue to be battered thanks to unremitting Maoists violence and high-handedness despite being a constituent of the government. To add salt to the injury the scumbags have just given themselves a huge pay rise when the vast majority struggle to make both ends meet. Had it not been for the remittance money sent in by countless folks working in different corners of the world owing to poverty, this country would have been in a far worse condition than North Korea. SPAM is the worst thing to have ever happened to Nepal.
    The SPAM government has recently decided to provide Rs 1 million, yup, you heard it right Rs 1 million to the family members of all maoists who were killed in Gaur and other skirmishes. Sure, they can give them whatever amount they want by all means but give them from their own pocket – for God’s sake not from the state coffers. And of course not to forget the millions that the government gives the Maoists combatants every month when the government does not even have the money to buy petroleum products.

  3. Neil-It is clear that both sides, i.e. the Army and the Maoists were involved in torture and gross human rights violations. Ideally both should be punished. Who are you to say that the Maoist leadership did not consent to the torture of their perceived enemies? Also talking about systematic, every one knows how systematically the Maoists used civilians as human shields. Are you refuting that as well?

    I do agree with you that the Army probably comes of worse off in the ‘civilians killed’ list. Also being a state army as opposed to a rebel group, they should be held more accountable.

  4. Its certain Maoists will lose. They did great in the countryside but easily fell for Girija’s snake politics in the city. They couldnt withstand the rightists’ propaganda.

    I think it’d be best for them and for the country if they accept a minority role, should they lose, which they will. I have always maintained that the best arrangement would be pol parties and maoists sharing power. NC, NCD should merge and form one big rightist entity, maoist should lead leftist, UML should either join them or perish – I dont see their relevance. And of course monarchy must take a hike. I think Neil is trying to stress the relevance of maoists as a balancing factor for Nepal, which I agree 100%. But indomitable tyranny of either (NC, Maoists) is unacceptable.

    For those who wish maoists to disappear from the face of the earth, dont forget it’d lead us to status quo. We need maoists but in a more neutralized form.

  5. I think we are wasting our time by directing our responses to losers from the West who can’t make up their mind — someone who could be an illegitimate child of a western spy of USSR who was caught and incarcerated by the US…. and now, the same person is wholeheartedly supporting the Maoist cause in order to take his revenge on god knows who. This is an issue of Nepal and we need to be talking about those issues and not be distracted by these losers from the West who would rather be sitting in their own country if they made any name for themselves there. Thye wouldn’t be walking around eating off the streets in Nepal after they spent their nights in a 60 Rs guest house in Jonche and then try and lecture Nepalese all day.

    The issue here is that the teacher turned terrorist (TTT) Pushpa Kamal is trying to thawrt the eletions. True that the rest of SPA have had their share of misgivings. True that the autocratic king has completely screwed up. But we as Nepalese have to make up our mind about what is it that we want. I can’t think of a situation where we can’t can all there of them (terrorists, corrupt politicans and autocratic king). One of them have to survive if not two or all of them. So, we need to make a choice and make that choice through CA. We need to fight for the CA to take place, vote out the autocratic king and the autocratic communist terrorists and vote for a liberal democratic Nepal. Then, we can deal with the corrupt thugs using the democratic institutions. Else TTT and his gang will continue to take advantage of gripe people have against the political parties. What has been display now hasn’t necessarily been the tactfulness or the strength of the Maosists. It has been the weakness of the currupt thugs and the weakness of the democratic weakness. TTT has categorically accepted this in his interviews. What we need to work now is on strengthening the democratic insitutions. This cannot be done by wasting our time responding to loswers from the West.

  6. “The armed conflict was actually initiated by Koirala in one “Operation Romero,” a series of systematic rapes, beatings, and tortures carried out by the police in Rolpa a few months before the Maoists began armed actions.”
    –Neil, you sound to be a very sensible person. Get your facts right before twisting them to suit your aguments. “Operation Romeo” was a response–a badly botched on no doubt–to the Maoist mayhem in Rolpa and the person responsible for it was Deuba, Prachanda’s friend and benefactor, not Koirala.

  7. Interesting. I was talking to a girl who works in the OHCHR office the day before yesterday about the TRC draft too. She told me that since the information under discussion is confidential, that she is unable to share any of the details with me at this time. She indicated the need for UNMIN to keep an impartial and independent posture so that rumors don’t spoil the peace process.

    But without even dragging the UN’s name into this discussion, it is clear that both sides of the conflict are guilty. SYSTEMATIC or not, an abuse is an abuse and since there is no documentation to validate whether or not the Maoists engaged in SYSTEMATIC abuses (they tended to kill journalists who wrote about them during the insurgency), it’s more appropriate to leave the “relativity” out of any rights discussion and go with “absolute” abuses.

    Or, we could start down the path of the systematic political murders that the Maoist leadership ordered to clear the countryside of any political party than their own. But turly, it is immaterial whether one side committed “more” or “less” abuses than the other. Let’s stick with the fact that both committed abuses and both should be punished accordingly.

    Then comes the great game of numbers. Again, a moot point. All parties including those in power, are guilty. There’s no question of more or less blood – it’s idiotic to go down this path. Personally, I say it’s 5000 deaths by the Maoists and 7000 by the State (at the instigation of the Maoists) so it’s ultimately 12000 deaths that the Maoists are either directly or indirectly accountable for. Others may disagree.

    The main issue is this: let’s continue this discussion by either separating the Army from the Politicians or by grouping them together. Let’s not single out the Army when it’s convenient to glorify “relatively” benign Maoist atrocities and group the Army with politicians when it’s convenient to undermine the politicians. This is what the Maoists did all throughout the insurgency. The insurgency is over now. So is this game of mixing issues.

  8. “Thus, the political parties have just as much, if not more, blood on their hands than the Maoists.”

    Learn to read people. “As much, if not more” Does not mean more.

    As there was no serious effort to curtail the human rights abuses of the Army by the political parties or the King (and not much of one now by the way), Both of them are as culpable for the Army’s human rights abuses as the Maoist leaders are for the PLA’s.

    Baje: the difference between my U.N. friend and yours is that mine doesn’t buy into the U.N. bullshit. While he did tell me that the Army is responsible for much more serious human rights violations, he also told me that the Maoists don’t have 10% support and they never did. Because of his low tolerance of official bullshit, I respect his opinion a great deal, while I can’t vouch for it’s validity.

  9. “they tended to kill journalists who wrote about them during the insurgency”

    There were 3 photographers and 4 Journalist killed by Maoists while there were 2 photographers and 9 Journalists killed by the army. Neither is it impossible to gauge the relative pattern of abuse during the conflict nor did the Maoists have a monopoly on killing journalists. I agree with you that the relative numbers to not matter. The problem is the ridiculous notion is that one side is “bad” and the other is “good” or it’s equivalent (One side started it, and the other side was just doing their job).

    In case the post I just made doesn’t make it– “As much if not more” does not mean “more.”

    Click to access Total_Killings.pdf

  10. Guyfrmktm,

    Yes, it would be best to get rid of the autocratic king and maoists in one go and deal with the rest of the incompetent and corrupt thugs democratically. However, you dont seem to realize that the main reason behind the maoist insurgency and the kings take over was the fact that these democratic thugs were incompentent and corrupt. Before we address the issue of both corruption, inter party democracy, inclusiveness and incompetence, i am afraid no solution will be viable enuff.

  11. Reality is not about solutions or good or bad, democracy means inclusiveness and equality.
    You have a long way to go…
    Villages will have undemocratic system because they are afraid of mafia retaliation there will be no privacy.
    Maybe somebody can suggest apart from supervision abroad how to avoid somebody finding out I vote for what they don’t want and something happens.?

  12. We don’t see any hope with these immatured leaders. The longer they run the country, the pile-up of problems created by themselves will amplify. They are the one who created the maoist problems, they are the one who encouraged to the king to takeover. They are now creating the environment of chaos without direction and goal. How long it can go ?

  13. ‘India’s grand design’ – Pushpa Kamal Dahal

    Have you been talking to India on madhes?

    Yes, we have been talking. I have been putting forward our views to the Indian ambassador and also officials in Delhi. If India had wanted, the mess in the tarai could have been avoided. The Indians blame the open border, but we find it difficult to buy that argument. They have a strategy to undermine the revolution in Nepal. Indian officials are working on a grand design to expand their influence in the tarai. We have been resisting their attempts.

    What’s your current policy towards India?

    At the centre of our people’s war was the issue of nationalism. But when India began arresting our leaders and we saw Indian intervention everywhere, we decided to fight against it and even planned to fight a tunnel war against India. I had prepared a proposal on this after reading about Vietnam’s tunnel warfare. We were talking to the palace before 1 February 2005 but the situation took a nasty turn after the royal takeover. We then accepted Delhi’s help to forge an alliance with the parliamentary parties. We wanted to discuss the 12-point agreement in Rolpa, but Girijababu suggested Delhi. He used to come to us after evading the Indians. But we never believed that this was being done without India’s knowledge. Girijababu was India’s guest. India did play a role in the agreement. Through Congress, we also developed a relationship with India.

    So what does India want from you? And what do you want from India?

    A relation based on equality. We want to evaluate past treaties and agreements on that basis. During this transitional period we want them to extend positive support as a good neighbor. But maybe India wants us to work for their interest. After we joined the government, we haven’t done that. In the tarai, India played a role to marginalise our influence. This is not right.

    What’s your take on Indian ambassador Mukherjee’s recent comment on CA elections?

    The language he used is objectionable. It seems as if India is trying to dictate Nepal and Nepalis. Somewhat it smacks of former American ambassador Moriarty’s speech.

  14. The view from New Delhi-

    The Indian establishment doesn’t try to hide anymore its irritation with the Nepali political parties trying to dodge elections and endanger the peace process that it helped broker and micromanage for the past two years.

    In a series of interviews in New Delhi this week, Indian politicians and policy-makers said they would like to see the peace process come to its logical conclusion with elections in November.

    “Remember we were the only ones pushing for June elections and the last few months have been proven right,” one diplomat here told us, “problems have only increased since then. Missing the November date can have extremely destabilising consequences.”

    Delhi believes that the polls can lock the Maoists irreversibly into the mainstream, pave the way for stability, provide a platform to address other grievances and demands, and limit the role of the internationals, especially the UN.

    South Block has been taking public positions on polls and sent strong messages privately to leaders. In Kathmandu, Ambassador Shiv Shankar Mukherjee has told Prime Minister Koirala that the government would face a severe legitimacy crisis if elections do not take place.

    Former Indian intelligence officers met Maoist leader Pushpa Kamal Dahal recently in Siliguri passing on a similar message from New Delhi. External Affairs Minister Pranab Mukherjee is reported to have personally shot down the proposal by Koirala and Dahal idea of converting the present interim legislature into a constituent assembly and instead pushing for polls.

    At the same time, New Delhi realises the limits of its leverage in Kathmandu. “We can push, we can threaten, we use different channels to communicate the message but it finally boils down to the political will of the major parties and whether they want polls,” an MEA source said.

    What is new in foreign policy-making circles here in the past few months is a sense of pessimism, and a belief that the peace process has become shakier.

    Delhi diplomats and analysts are satisfied with UNMIN’s performance so far, but they want it to pack up and go as soon as possible. Even so, irrespective of the polls they admit UNMIN may have to stay on in some form for another six months to complete arms management. Although India may accept a limited extension of tenure, officials say an extension of UNMIN’s mandate is out of the question. But what riles officials here is their belief that UNMIN is angling for a political role in the tarai, and even goading madhesi groups to ask for international mediation.

    “This goes beyond what was decided when India let the UN in and Ian Martin should tell his officials to be restrained,” one influential Nepal analyst said. New Delhi also blames Koirala for delaying taking a personal lead to appease madhesi groups while the crisis was still manageable. They have tried to get the message across to the prime minister, but say when it comes to the tarai Koirala refuses to listen to them. Officials say they don’t want a further proliferation of madhesi groups and reportedly discouraged mainstream madhesi politicians, including NC and NSP dissidents, from forming a separate party. There have been allegations that India is supporting madhesi armed groups because Goit and Jwala Singh live in Bihar.

    When asked about this, a former ambassador to Nepal testily posed his own questions: “Look, at who is accusing India of this? The Maoists. Where did they stay all along? Does it mean we were supporting them? Get your house in order instead of blaming and expecting us to come and clean the mess.”

    Indian policymakers seem more sanguine about the Nepal Army’s intentions. As long as the government does not tamper with the army’s structure with security sector reforms, they feel the generals will play along. “There is no point messing with the army right now,” said a retired Indian Army general, “it remains the bulwark against the Maoists and is the only back-up if everything falls apart.”

    There has been a change of guard at the Nepal desk of the MEA, and the new occupant has just returned from a fam tour of Kathmandu. Although India looms large in Kathmandu. Here, Nepal is overshadowed by some global crisis or other and this week it is the fallout from the India-US nuclear deal.

  15. It’s great to know that there are UN team members in Nepal who do not believe in the UN. This is quite a revealing statement and thank you for making it.

    To make this dialogue meaningful, let’s stick to facts that can be verified and steer away from opinions that can’t be validated. By your own admission, examples of things that can’t be validated include both the alleged “more serious” nature of rights violations by the army and the 10% support base (or lack thereof) for the Maoists.

    If relative numbers do not matter (which was Baje’s stipulation – and a point of agreement it appears), then why do you insist on using them to forward arguments? The notion that one side is better (or worse) than the other IS ridiculous. So why hassle, arguing that it’s possible to “gauge the relative pattern of abuse” – after all, this is a relative statement, is it not?

    All your posts on this string make your point perfectly clear – “As much if not more” does not mean “more”. And there you go again, basing your entire argument on the concept of “relativity” after you agree that “relative numbers to not matter.”

    Contradicting yourself doesn’t work well when you’re trying to make a point. Might a small suggestion be made that those who ask others to “read” also “read” what they themselves write?

    As written above:

    The main issue is this: let’s continue this discussion by either separating the Army from the Politicians or by grouping them together. Let’s not single out the Army when it’s convenient to glorify “relatively” benign Maoist atrocities and group the Army with politicians when it’s convenient to undermine the politicians. This is what the Maoists did all throughout the insurgency. The insurgency is over now. So is this game of mixing issues.

    (And thank you for the link from INSEC. Is this the same INSEC led by the Pyakuryal brothers – one of whom was involved in falsifying the nature of the “atrocious crimes” committed against Maoist cadres in Gaur? Or was that someone else? With so many groups organizations and individuals doing such uplifting work in our country, it’s hard to keep track).

  16. Pranchande has suggested for the postponment of CA till April on ground that Maoist are not in a better position presently. Ha Ha Ha …………..
    Tomorrow if another party will say they are not in better position so again postpone it.
    What a childish remark. Can you do politics with this childish brain guys.
    But this remark came from the GREAT………………founder of Prachand Path.
    Keep it up. You are backed by sink tank MAHA MURKHA Bhattrai too.

  17. hey horny,

    Do you know who/how/why armed revolution started in Nepal?

    Do you know the 22 points forwarded by baburam bhattarai before starting armed revolt?

    Who attacked police post at Rukum and Udaypur and looted all the weapons?

    You have all the statistics of the killings may but you have forgotten who started the concept of killing people for their selfishness.

    Army was not involved in any killings before maoists attack army post at Dang. It was then government who deployed army. If you want your bullshits to be answered ask Sher bahadur Deuba, who deployed army against maoist.

    It is the Nepalese Army who brought maoists under peace accord. Even their leader prachande accepted this after the unsuccessful attack on Army Camp at Khara. After which maoist army was so much disintegrated , they did not even think of regaining military strength and attack again.

  18. These 22 points set by maoists looks similar to those before starting armed revolt, only the difference is, this time they did not include any points against india.

    So maoist have changed a lot and in the mean time they have forgotten the national dignity and pride.

  19. neil ,

    These preconditions set by maoists have nothing to deal with nepalese army. Right now NA is limited within their premesies and it is the YCL who are terrorising people.

  20. hey neil,
    which country are you from.
    and why are you praising the maoist??????
    all the sides are equally responsible.
    and maoist seems more untouchable by law and your comments.
    your propaganda of throwing dirt at the army is obviously not working here in this blog as number of ppl who do not agree with you. if you really believe that maoist are the solution of nepal my friend you are not welcomed in my nation. maoist maybe a part of solution but they are more a part of the problem. being a nepali the cutural aspect is very important to me. and you dont seem to understand any of it. i dont like the army but more so i do not like the maoist. for the children they have in their ranks, for the mass kidnappings, for the murders and the most important is that they rose by force and they do not have any plan or vision of nepal how it should be. they are all very short sighted, look at the armed groups in terai maoist are directly responsible for it. and once the civil war will end the crime rates in nepal will sky rocket, just looking at the maosit power structure you can anticipate it. they do nto have any economic plan to move the nation forwad why because they came to power with force and this is all they know. of course you can also say the same about the army that they know only how to use force. but they are not pretending to run the nation. and they seem to respect the wish of the masses more than the maoist.
    so if you still continue to praise the maoist mate FCkoff

  21. “It is the Nepalese Army who brought maoists under peace accord.”
    I am sure, this line has been written after some very large pegs of whisky! May be even some bottles of Khukuri Rum.

  22. If sane people cannot distinguish between State and Revolutionary and equate them with same yardstick then what we have is experts like Neil who is hell bent on demostrating his neo liberalism that has no place in the sun. Now the question to you all- are we a soveriegn nation or a satellite nation? Do we have pride in being Nepali or not? So why cannot we use our soveriegn right to rule, make law, and come to consensus rather than talk about India, fringe party with arms, and footloose SPA. All that is happening in the name of Loktrantra is Barbaditrantra.

  23. Four People are mainly responsible for the current instability and disaster in the country. They are in terms of ranking Pol pot Prachande, Pataki Gyane, most corrupt Girija, and most corrupt sher Bahadur Deuba. I don’t think there will be any peace in the country unless we tie them together and then hang them together at Tunduikhel in front of the general public.

  24. “It is the Nepalese Army who brought maoists under peace accord.”

    -Prachanda descided to start open politics after their worst defeat in Khara. A batalion strength of NA defeated 2-division worth of so-called PLAs.

    – After that, maoists were so much demoralized, they did not even think of regaining military strength, instead opted for open politics.

    – Hey scopy, are you another trishul baba? Even your predictions are wrong. Ask Pu. Ka. Da. how much peg he had when peace accord signed?

  25. XTP:

    You are 100% right. Prachande, Gyane, girija, and Sher Bahadur are the ones who totally destroyed Nepal for their vested interest. So, they should be fed human wastes before they are hanged.

  26. The fight for existance between three strengths!! Nepali congree- no confident because the country is almost in the way of republic. Monarchy- actions before to finish and Maoist- fear of 12 year revolution because it will seem worthless thenafter !!!
    so its terrible ahead !! Beware people !!!
    republic nepal- jindabad

  27. Neil again you are getting caught in yor own game just like your maoist mentors. It catches up with you sooner or later as Prachanda has been realising of late.

    You did say one thing which is correct – yes it was GPK who messed things up for this nation with the Kilo Sera, I believe (Romeo according to you). For the maoist cause GPK did them a favour. Doing nothing would have been better as, all they would be is a small bunch of terrorists like we see here and there in Nepal these days – who knows another one of these operations by the EPA and the small bunch we see these days could outdo the maoists in a couple of years time and you can then join their bandwagon and write another thesis to glorify them as well.

  28. all of us stupid people and the stupid media are wasting our time— we are too stupid to not undestand anything anymore– Teacher Turned Terrorist (TTT) Pushpa Kamal has already said that his comments were distorted by the media and misunderstood by the people– and I am sure some loser from the West will have an elaborate explanation to this all– so, let’s not waste our time and lets debate about what we want out of this CA— do we the want the terrorists to win the elections? Do we or do we not want these corrupt political parties to win? And do we or do we not want the autocratic king to stay in Nepal? Well, if the answer to all these questions is a NO then, god save this country. Someone has to take this country forward. We can’t sit on our bums and criticize everyone under the sun. We can’t just hope to have the CA at any cost and not expect any three of these to win the elections. There is just no one else!! Hello, wake up! And mobilize your forces on two fronts– one, demand for CA at any cost. Two- fight out the long term goal of the communist terrorists to turn this country into an all out autocratic communist regime to be caller People’s Republic of Nepal!!

  29. Girija is the most shameless and unauspicious animal on this whole planet. Everytime he became the PM of Nepal, the country faced the worst disasters. They include incidents like PIA airliner accident, Thai airliner accident, Palace massacre, and so many other disasters. Now people in Kathmandu can not get drinking water in rainy season even if Nepal ranks second most abundant country in water resources (next to Brazil).
    Why does he need to worry whether people of Kathmandu is getting water supply or not as long as he can afford to buy bottled water. This animal is not concerned about any kinds of problem that people are facing as long as his PM post is safe. I am pretty sure Nepal is going to face so many disasters in the days to come during his tenure as the PM of Nepal. I wish this animal could be cremated at Pashupati Aryaghat Within a month or so for the welfare of Nepali People.

  30. It is widely believed that a vulture brings unauspicious happenings to our family When it lands on the roof our house. Likewise, Girija is expected to bring bad incidints to Nepal since he has landed on the roof of Nepal. That is why he is also well-known by another name: “Giddhe Budho.”

  31. “-Prachanda descided to start open politics after their worst defeat in Khara. A batalion strength of NA defeated 2-division worth of so-called PLAs.”

    Can you provide me the evidence? Not just of the battle, but of the fact, ( as you claim ) that the Maoists were so demoralized that they opted for peace?

  32. “-Prachanda descided to start open politics after their worst defeat in Khara. A batalion strength of NA defeated 2-division worth of so-called PLAs.”

    Can you provide me the evidence? Not just of the battle, but of the fact, ( as you claim ) that the Maoists were so demoralized that they opted for peace?

    According to my information, the Khara incident happened in April 2005. The Maoists attacked Tansen and destroyed it in January 2006. That’s almost nine months later. So after deciding that they could not face the mighty NA nine months ago, they went and destroyed a town……….. ( And, I think, there were several other incidents too….)

    Does that make sense?

  33. Baje:

    The reason I mentioned the the Relatively worse human rights record of the Army compared to the Maoists was to point out that

    A. The political parties

    B. The king

    have JUST AS MUCH if not more blood on their hands as the Maoist leadership. This is not to glorify the Maoists. It is simply to point out how ridiculous it is to single out the Maoists as “Terrorists” When their opponents have engaged in AS MUCH if not more terrorist activity.

    Now if you don’t understand what the words AS MUCH mean, I understand, many IELTS students of mine have difficulty with the same. However, please don’t cover up your misunderstanding of my point with a bunch of double talk.

    I am not linking the political parties and the king to the army alternately when I find it convienient. They were BOTH linked to the Army at one point or another during the conflict and BOTH made little to no effort to reign in the Human rights abuses of the Army. So, they BOTH have as much if not more blood on their hands than the Maoists (though the king probably has more than the parties). This relationship does not change when it is convenient. It is always there. If any side of this conflict has engaged in terrorism than all sides have.

  34. Baje:

    The reason I mentioned the the Relatively worse human rights record of the Army compared to the Maoists was to point out that

    A. The political parties

    B. The king

    have JUST AS MUCH if not more blood on their hands as the Maoist leadership. This is not to glorify the Maoists. It is simply to point out how ridiculous it is to single out the Maoists as “Terrorists” When their opponents have engaged in AS MUCH if not more terrorist activity.

    Now if you don’t understand what the words AS MUCH mean, I understand Many IELTS students of mine have difficulty with the same. However, please don’t cover up your misunderstanding of my point with a bunch of double talk.

    I am not linking the political parties and the king to the army alternately when I find it convienient. They were BOTH linked to the Army at one point or another during the conflict and BOTH made little to no effort to reign in the Human rights abuses of the Army. So, they BOTH have as much if not more blood on their hands than the Maoists (though the king probably has more than the parties). This relationship does not change when it is convenient. It is always there. If any side of this conflict has engaged in terrorism then all sides have.

  35. Hey Neil,

    Can you say that NA has relatively worst human rights records from the Madi heights of Chitawan?

    Listen to the song by Nepathya “Maina Pokhari ko Ghatana”, not to worry if you do not understand those stanza, music tells the story.

    By the way, did UNMIN qualify you this time?

  36. Hey Neil,

    Can you say that NA has relatively worst human rights records from the Madi heights of Chitawan?

    Listen to the song by Nepathya “Maina Pokhari ko Ghatana”, not to worry if you do not understand those stanza, music tells the story.

    By the way, did UNMIN qualify you this time?

  37. Neil- if you really do have such a sympathy for Maoist and equate them with state then you got bigger fight to fight- just take a case of Red Indians and their deprivation in reservation pockets streched out across the desert of USA. Yes, you have right to comment but what I fail to understand is how can you equate Maoist insurgency with State. I take from your argument this and i.e., if I revolt with power and might- no matter what other say, I should be treated equal with the state because according to my logic- my call for revolution is based on people’s asipration, poverty and discrimination- therefore just and I have few lunatics who believe in me and willing to kill but barometer should be in par with State. In similar fashion- Madeshi are calling strikes and bandhs- it is their right therefore equally justifiable. It is a way to opening a pandora’s box and it is happening and you should not be the one to say Madeshi are wrong and Maoist are right. As it is- now let the course of action decide which is what or what is right and wrong – no more sermons with prejudice.

  38. The childish decision of spam is; they are planning to go jointly against the different ethnic/regional parties in the name of barrier to CA like they did to what they called royalists. But they don’t know how much price they have to pay for this action. Although many of the terai parties believe in gun like maoist used to do, but many others like limbuwan, khumbuwan, tamangselo and even terai ethnic/regional political parties are still sticking in the peace-talk for their rights. Those who still believe in peace-talk will definately become the great sufferers of the syndicate proposed foolish action. This will bring no alternate to them except to raise the weapons against the spam for their rights. Until and unless equal sharing to all ethnic groups do not exist at central level of current ruling parties, the problem will linger and might go to out of control before and even after the CA election. The result will be all ethnic/regional parties will topple and wipe out the spam’s syndicate rule.

  39. Neil,
    1. Interesting that you say the King probably has more blood on him then the parties and the maoists. How do you come to such a conclusion? It sounds like soundbytes coming out of the mouths of a maoist propoganda machine.

    2. How do you figure the army under the guidance of the parties and the King have as much or more blood in their hands as the maoists? Do you mean the body count after each person is killed whether it be in defence to safeguard people, public property, towns, infracstructure, or do you mean the people killed when army barracks are attempted at being overrun by maoists at no instigation by the army (including unarmed engineering battalions like the Pioneer), not to mention the forced human shields of villagers used as sacrificial lambs in the frontline of these human wave attacks by maoists (the army’s bullet killed the villager but who forced the person to be there in the frontline?) – so who is reponsible or do you just count the prisoners who have been killed on both sides. Again the Kilo serra operations under GPK is when I remember any hugely mistaken offensive operation taken by the govt. with the armed police force not the army (call it Girija’s army if you must), but most of the army operations have been defensive. Yes prisoner abuses were there and they must be followed up and the guilty prosecuted on both sides, but this comparison of AS MUCH OR MORE is baseless as the offence was all the maoist’s doing – if you stir a hornets nest you will probably get stung.
    3. In the topic of bringing to justice the rights abusers on the security forces and maoist sides, it is imperitive that all must be brought to justice all the way to the top. Let me remind people that the Chitwan bombing case is one that Prachanda himself has accepted the responsibility for publically with a simple “Sorry” – time to begin by booking him and let justice be done. Would this be convenient enough for you?

  40. neil, I fully support the view of hawa regarding the comparison of army againts Maoist terrorists. If you have some brain read the history. Who started the fight with army. It was maoist who attacked the Maoist thugs who launched attack on Dang barrack, until then Army was sidline, it was the government that ordered army out of barrack. Credit goes to army for showing lot of restrain and most of their action was defensive. that is the reason many people was saved, if army has decided to go for pure tactical warfare, like your brother british in Malaysia and now in afghanistan many more civilian could have caught in middle and died. What do you expect when you are attacked welcome the maoist terrorist in their lap. of course you will kill to and fight to protect yourselves, and how maoist killed the captured police and army brutally. Therefore, try you may it is maoist terrorist who started the war ( when they started war there was democratically elected government and parliamentary democracy was in place and they could have participated in election and put their demand peacefully) Now, after killing 13,000 people what maoist got , 4 ambassdors, few bunch of fools in parliament and few berth of ministry’s ? and same SPA leader in helm who was in power when they started the mess. So who is responsible for so much death and destruction of infrastructure ? Now, people have to ask what did we get ? and at what cost ? and most important who is responsible.

  41. just becaus eyou teach IELTS does not mean that you know more about nepal than anyone else. just because you dont have a king does not mean that we also can do away with the king. the maoist insurgency started in 1996 and the army was deployed 2001 so you saying that the army killed more ppl in this timespan than the maoist in 11 yrs. if you beleve that the maoist are the better choice then im sure you will want osama bin laden to run for us president. an average nepali is not who you see in the street protesting the average nepali is in thier house sick and tired of everything. and you do not need to remind them which side is how much deep in mierda. i believe that the ppl are able to decide by them selves, what they are unable to do is to get together and stand up for their right. this is the biggest problem of nepal. so if you are really trying to help then try to teach ppl their right to have a dignified life not to take side you educated moron. if you are really a good teacher then understand your students and dont abuse your status spreading propaganda, if you see a persons weak ness stop exploiting it like your brothers of the west always have done. dont be an arrogant we all know all of them ie. maoist, army, politicians are same ¨dyang ko mula¨you do not need to make a huge out cry for it.

    well if you are being cohersed by the YCL goons to post these i completly forgive you. but anyway you will be the first one to pay their tax that they start collecting very recently.

  42. Call them Presidents/Prime Ministers but we need someone to lead the govt. and foolish me, I’d rather have one elected by the people rather than a mumbo jumbo avataar of Vishnu or mumbo jumbo avataar of Chairman Mao.

  43. I see. So you think you’re doing a public service by levelling the playing field on behalf of the Maoists.

    If your only defence to being a Maoist sympathizer is others’ command of the English language, I’m afraid you’re on a losing streak. Just admit that your objective is to make the Maoists look good (or as you like to phrase it, as bad as the political parties and the king) and we’ll all be squared away. You may be an IELTS teacher but your condescending attitude that everyone else MISUNDERSTANDS your writing is nonsense. To the contrary, everyone on this forum seems to understand perfectly well where your allegiances lie so please spare us the play on your “relative” arguments.

    And there you go again, making wild accusations you cannot possible prove. Like your imaginary friend at the UN (who doesn’t care about how the UN works), your imaginary depiction of the Maoists as equally bad as everyone else, doesn’t change the facts. And the facts are that your dear Maoists have been wiped out from the Terai, from their home bases in Rukkum, Rolpa, Jajarkot and Sallyan and are soon to be wiped off the plate of political significance, after the CA elections.

    How familiar are you with the relationship that the Maoists had with Birendra (and the ties they currently retain, with Gyanendra)? How familiar are you with the relationship that the parties always had with the Maoist leaders, throughout the insurgency? Neither of these relationships change based on convenience either.

    Your not-so-subtle attempt to equate Maoists to the state (based on terrorism as a measure) is ingenuous. No matter how hard you use your IELTS teaching skills, your position is crystal clear – you are a Maoist sympathizer and it is your objective to equate the status of Maoists to that of the state, to pre-empt any human rights related action against the Maoists.

    Just admit that you are in bed with the Maoists and that you endorse the civil war they waged and there will be nothing left to debate. Everyone can move on then and put your character in perspective – another aspiring Western expert, bitter at his own government, indoctrinated with radical leftist leanings, unable to practice such teachings at home, so you’re in Nepal making pretending that the Nepalese Maoists’ cause, is your own.

    It’s ok to be a Maoist. Just be comfortable with your political leanings and yourself, and save yourself this unnecessary embarassment.

  44. I think this debate is getting old. Bottomline – we need a balanced leftist-rightist power sharing in the country, but neither in a highly indomitable position. Sure, it’ll bring its own probs, political stalemates and all that but will be fairly representative than previous. If maoists want to lead the leftist let them … but we can’t have status quoist power in the hands of few elite. Whoever tries to meddle with CA they should knw better wht price they are set to pay in the immediate future.

  45. “Maoist thugs who launched attack on Dang barrack, until then Army was sidline, it was the government that ordered army out of barrack.”
    –Oh, silly me. I always thought that the then Royal Army ordered the government to impose internal emergency so that it could succeed in defending its barracks. The RNA didn’t do much else except sometimes defending their own barracks?

  46. Foolish me -Okay let’s put it to you in a simplified manner – if we opt for a parliamentary system (i.e with a PM as head of government) then why do we need Presidents for that matter? Presidents in this sort of system are’nt elected or am I living in Mars?

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