THE WAR IS OVER, NEPAL DECLARES!

How it feels to see the end of the bloody war An emotional blog

By Dinesh Wagle
Wagle’s Web Log

Less than a minute ago, amidst a grand and historic ceremony, Nepali leaders agreed to end the war that killed more than 13 thousand people in the last 10 years. Prime Minister Girija Prasad Koirala and CPN Maoist Chairman Prachanda put their respective signatures in the Comprehensive Peace Agreement that formally ended the bloodshed in Nepal. The signature ceremony is being telecast live and it has been reported that people have started celebrating the historic achievement. Honestly, my hands are trembling as I am typing these lines. I mean it’s kind of unbelievable. Who would have though about this day when Beni was attacked, when Madi was bombed, when operation Kilo Sera 2 was launched, when Holery incident happened, when Dang barrack was attacked?

Of course, I am being emotional because the continuity of war was certain to derail my personal life, my social life and my future; OUR LIVES AND OUR FUTURE. Like thousands of other families my family has also been displaced by the conflict. Life has become difficult. I am wondering how my mother, like so many other displaced mothers, would react if she goes back to her house in the near future after nearly 6 years. She says that she misses her house very much. She says she doesn’t really like the life in Kathmandu. She says she likes to live in village. In HER village, in HER house.

So who should be blamed for the difficulties my mother and thousands of women and children faced in the past several years? No one. Not Maoists, not Nepal government. I don’t want to blame any side for this as I understand the problem is larger than anything that could be fitted into a family’s case. I still feel the war wasn’t personal though, many a times, people were personally targeted. I am just thankful (to whom I don’t know) that my father wasn’t killed like his fellow Village Development Committee Chairmen and Nepali Congress activists were murdered in various parts of the country; he was just kicked out of his house and his village by the Maoists. I am thankful to God that my aunt wasn’t killed like so many other innocent housewives; she was just beaten up and tortured by the Maoists for three days. I am thankful that Maoists never blasted off my house in Ramechhap, they just came inside, forcefully though, with a few grenades and bombs and took away food. I am just thankful that my house where I was born isn’t totally destroyed, it’s just damaged partly because no one is staying for long period in the mud and stone structure. Though Maoists captured and cultivated the land for about 6 years and deprived us from the grains, I am thankful that our land is still registered in the name of my father and mother.

We, like so many thousands of other families, became what they call the ‘collateral damage’. I mean my family is still the privileged one, still being able to feed and have a place to live in Kathmandu. What about those who are living miserable life, forced to stay out of their homes and take refuge to others’ residents? What about those who were killed? What about some of my childhood friends who died (two of them as “terrorist”)? How are their surviving family members celebrating this day? I am curious to know.

After the celebration is over we must concentrate ourselves in institutionalizing this peace. We have known the price of this peace. Now is the time to talk about reconciliation. I wouldn’t be truthful if I say that I had never thought about taking revenge against those who forced my family to leave their house and village. But I don’t believe in revenge anymore. There is no use of that. Time will change everything. The Maoist cadre who came to my house with a few grenades and a gun one evening to demand ‘donation’ left the Maoist party years ago. He is now a columnist for a newspaper in Kathmandu writing against the party. The man who is primarily responsible in capturing our land and keeping our family out of village telephoned my dad a few days ago in Kathmandu. Time has definitely changed. So this is the time of reconciliation. We must be united at this hour to institutionalize the peace and democracy in this country.

Here we go, lets sing with Lennon. I am doing the same in loud voice:

A very Merry Xmas
And a happy New Year
Let’s hope it’s a good one
Without any fear
War is over, if you want it
War is over now

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63 thoughts on “THE WAR IS OVER, NEPAL DECLARES!”

  1. I am also celebrating the peace on my own way. I think after the CA election Nepal should focus on economic front. Economic progress is the most. Hydropower potential should be utilized.

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  2. In addition to what I have wrtten in my letter to Prachanda,we must all agree that the only benefit Nepalis had from Prachand’s murder campaign was the possible elimination of Monarchy from the political power or any day-to-day politics of Nepal. That also, only future can tell.

    But I am annoyed to know that Sainik Sachibalaya is still working inside the Palace despite parliament’s decision to remove it from there.

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  3. Prof. Pyare Lall

    I hope not much can that Sachibalaya will do any harm to country if the situation progress in present direction.

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  4. reading this blog and comments one comes to following conclusions
    1. people are happy.
    2. leaders claim it to be a great victory.
    3. gyanendra has decide to get confined to the will of people.
    4. Maoists comitted attrocities on basis of assumptions and raw info but people in genral are ready to forgive them if peace is guaranteed to them.
    5. Mr. Wagle, that is dear dinesh is vindictive towards them and doesnt refrain from expressing it in a subtle way.

    WHAT IS HIDDEN AND NOT SEEN
    1. The people have been told or wanted to be happy by the leaders who instructed the plitical workers to organize celebrations across the country.
    2. The future still remains uncertain.
    3. How do we plan to cover the gap that has been created between us and the rest of the wotlrd due to this struggle.
    4. WORDS IN POLITICS MEAN NOTHING. SIGN AND TREATIES MEAN A LITTLE TO THE LEADER WHO OPENLY SAID IF THE PEOPLE AGREED IN FAVOUR OF SYMBLOIC MONARCHY THEY WILL GO AGAINST IT . this has connotaions
    a. the feeling of people has no regard.
    b. though they have come to the main politics or promised to come, they can not be truste because teh strengthening of the army stil continues.
    c. that the maoists are unsure of thier own hold amongst the masses which is rightly so.
    5. I remember reading an article by Dr. Baburam bhattarai way back in 2001 when he said thier always are only 20 % who actively support the revn, and 20 % who oppose it , rest of the population just changes the direction along with the mightier sword. SO waht does it mean ? The very basiis of communist ideology is based on the disregard to the opular consensus.
    6. Last, through this blog as well as the other blogds , it becomes clear that how personnel perceptions can bend opinions
    OPEN FOR DEBATES.

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  5. War is not over. War against poverty, inequality, feudalism hasn’t even been started in Nepal. We can be happy that this Maoist war has stopped, but if situation in Nepal stays like this, a new war will start soon.

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  6. Nepal’s politicians are to be blamed for all the the pain and suffer that the ordinary Nepalese are going through that includes the civil unrest that has totally wrecked the country. Hence the Maoists came into existence. Two wrongs doesn’t make a right. Neither of them seems to be in the interest of the genuine Nepalese people.
    As always Politicians have big mouth to talk but no actions. Just imagine, the amount of time we waste listening the same version again, again, and again when we could have done something better!
    The question is, Why aren’t they able to act or implement on their policies? There are plenty errors already made and it will remain to continue if there isn’t any immediate changes in the legislation, such as the PM (leader of the party) can only serve 2 terms in his power. This is important because the world changes and new leaders with new ideas should be given an opportunity and not follow the predecessors. We are trailing well behind in this world because of our politicians. Nepal have lots of opportunities but unless this is freely available to the public, we remain to slide behind.
    Age-old politicians should quit politics and retire. It is obvious that they can’t even look after themselves therefore, how is it possible that Nepal and Nepalese rely on them. There thoughts and ideas are already out-dated. We NEED new leaders from new generations to lead Nepal with the modern world.

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  7. I wish my Nepali friends all the best. hopefully this nightmare is over for good. But please don’t let your guard down.The commies are like snakes they cannot be fully trusted. Be on your guard but most of all enjoy this moment of joy and happiness:).May the Gods bless Nepal and its people.

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  8. This is a moment that we’re all waiting for which is a peace and lets keep it that way. There is still hope for our country and this is only going to happen if we work togather.

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  9. i am not sure if we should be celebrating just the decleration of the end of the war. it is only realistic to be happy when there is implementation of what has been declared. this moment, i am thinking how are they going to work this out? how can they ever gonna repay the damages there has been occured? i am not talking only about the maoist but also the government who’s efforts though are helpful but is not of a patriotic one. i am thinking about how are the maoist and the government going to assure the citizens that there wont be no more violence. Even though the past has been heavy on every nepalese, they are hopeful. There should not be any disappointments further.

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  10. today i read a news coverd by kathmandu post, in its second page. news has given so importance and is covered as a box news. the head line was “Roka can’t help it”. The news is releated with lawmaker Hari Roka and smoking . news is quoted that Mr Roka was breaking the law by smoking in parliament premises and after reminding by journalist he said i can’t help it. as the news When some journalists reminded him of the ban in smoking in the parliament premises, he laughed and said,”Oh, it goes on.” it means he was saying directly breaking the law. if law maker himself break the law like this how can the nation keep rules and regulation fit in the country. how much we can expect from such MP ? parliament is the supreme body and it formulate laws as demand the nation and so the people who inter the parliamnet by getting the people mandate through election directly involve in the law making process and it directs to the govermnet to implement law and order in the country. if mp himself break the law who will abide it and how can country run in law and order.so lawmaker Mr. Roka should strctly follow the law because he himslef formulate it. As a lawmaker u should see being good example among us.u have great figure among the people, we the people have great expect from u in the nation building process and request please follow the law which u yourself formulate it.

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