Independent Army (Nepal Army Behaves Like Parallel Government)

By brazenly violating the government decisions and policy, the army chief has signaled that royal palace still take the shots in Nepali politics

Based on today’s editoral in Kantipur

The visit of army chief Pyar Jung Thapa along with top army officers to the royal palace on the birthday of king Gyanendra gives the impression that the Royal Nepal Army is still into effect. In addition to that, the army also presented a 21-gun salute from Army Dais at Tundikhel making us forget the historical political change [a few weeks back in Nepal]. The royal palace trip of the army chief and the salute can’t be considered ordinary events. This is the open challenge to the democratic government by those who do not trust the political change and express unwillingness to accept that change.

The SPA (seven party alliance) government had decided no to celebrate the king’s birthday as a national event. As per that decision, embassies abroad didn’t organize formal programs. No public holiday was given inside the country. The cabinet had decided to limit the celebrations in palace by giving holiday to only palace staffs. Cabinet had also decided not to send high level officials to the palace. There is no doubt that Nepal Army was informed about these decisions.

Prime Minister, Deputy Prime Ministers, Ministers, leaders of political parties and secretaries didn’t go to the palace. Ministers decided not to go there and they notified their subordinates. But the same decision has been ignored by the army leadership. This should be an eye opener for the Alliance government. This is army chief’s disrespect and mistrust to the government. This is a severe blow to the feeling that the army is under the government. Both the chiefs of the Police (Armed Police and Nepal Police) didn’t go as per the government decision and, following the government policy, they celebrated the birthday in their headquarters.

Formally celebrating the royal birthday in the army headquarters was not enough for the army chief. It is fine to wish the king for good health and long life but it is not right to ignore the government order on that excuse. The army headquarter hasn’t formally given any notification about the salute at Tundikhel. According to the army officials, guns were fired under the direction of the army secretariat at the palace. This is a solid proof that the royal palace army secretariat is still functional. It is very clear that the army secretariat not only exists but also is actively issuing orders outside the palace. This is all because the Parliamentary Proclamation 2063 hasn’t been implemented.

Immediately after the restoration of the parliament, the SPA had decided to dignify the army by reforming it and making it a national institution there by neutralizing any possible dangers to democracy. That decision hasn’t been supported fully [by what is happening afterwards]. First, the army chief was treated in a special manner while other security chiefs were punished for the mistakes after Feb 1, 2005 [royal coup]. Unwillingness to appoint defense minister is yet another clear example that there is no political commitment to bring about real changes in the army. Similarly, the government hasn’t done homework to implement the historical decision that says the cabinet will oversee the security of the palace. This shows the government is busy trying to kill time without doing work of significance.

The determination of bringing army under cabinet and putting it under parliamentary supervision has not been turned into action and this is obstructing the creation of favorable environment to bring Maoists into mainstream. The government’s inability to dismiss the army secretariat and unwillingness to provide assurance of reform in the army by appointing defense minister has given Maoists good reasons to express concerns about possible conspiracy [against the peace process and achievements of peoples’ movement].

This will continue making the issue of Maoist arms and army management complex. Whatever the form of monarchy [after the April revolution]- be it constitutional, symbolic or ceremonial- the main intention of the Parliamentary Proclamation is to cut off the army’s tie with the palace. Army chief going to a place where no other government officials went and army presenting salute on the orders from palace army secretariat are enough to signal [army’s] mistrust on the parliament’s determination.

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223 thoughts on “Independent Army (Nepal Army Behaves Like Parallel Government)”

  1. replytoall you are a moron. All I am saying is that Kirats are not Hindus. Is that a racist statement? You are a moron for thinking so.

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  2. Taaya,
    This is a free for all forum, not your personal diary. If others want to discuss something you don’t want to and vice versa that’s not anyones problem – If you can’t stand the heat then stay way out of the kitchen.

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  3. The Kirats

    The Kirats were the aborigines of north-eastern Himalayas. According to Baburam Acharya, they came to Nepal in about 700 B.C. and ruled over it. They were short and had robust bodies, broad cheeks, flat noses, thin whiskers, and dark eyes. They were well trained in the art of warfare, and were very skilful archers. They were the ancestors of the present day Kiratas: – Kulung, Thulung and Yellung. Yalamber, the first Kirati king of Nepal belonged to the Yellung clan.

    The first king of the Kiratas was Yalamber, who defeated Bhuvan Singh, the last king of Ahir dynasty and established Kirat rule in Nepal. He extended his kingdom as far as the Tista river in the east and the Trishuli in the west. It is said that during the battle of Mahabharata, Yalamber went to witness the battle with a view to take the side of the losing party. Lord Krishna, knowing the intention of Yalamber and the strength and unity of the Kiratas, thought that the war would unnecessarily be prolonged if Yalamber sided with the Kauravas. So, by a clever stroke of diplomacy, Lord Krishna cut off Yalamber’s head.

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  4. Kirat Part 2 for those who are interested:

    The Kirat follow their own religion called Kirat Mundhum. As of 2001, census figures show that 3.6% of Nepalese follow this religion [1].

    Their holy book is the Mundhum. They believe in a supreme male deity Paruhang and a supreme female deity Sumnima. Other deities they worship include Sakela, Sakle, Toshi, Sakewa, Saleladi Bhunmidev, Chyabrung, Yokwa, Folsadar and Chendi. They have two main festivals: Sakenwa Uvauli, during plantation season; and Sankewa Udhauli, in the time of the harvest. They believe they are descended from an ancestor called Chandi.
    Ancient Hindu religious books the Puran and the Vedha have descriptions about the Kirat. Maha Shiva Puran describes God Shiva as a chief of a Kirat band.
    In ancient times, Nepal from east to west and south deep into India used to be called Mahabharat. Nepal still has a long range of Mahabharat hills from east to west. Nowadays, Bharat refers to India. There is an ancient story behind it:

    In ancient times, King Dushyanta of India married Shakuntala, the adopted daughter of Kanwa Rishi of Nepal. Their son Bharat ruled over here. Then Nepal was called Mahabharat, and the surrounding territories under the souvereignity of King Bharat was called Bharat.

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  5. Kirat and Taaya and others,

    I had only cited that Kirat were mentioned in Mahabharat and I said ‘perhaps’ (remember ‘perhaps’) they were Hindus. But you people do not have time to read those finer points. Plus, I never wrote Hinduism being greatest or that religion. Those were your words.

    And Taaya if you do not like Jani Purnima, do not celebrate…who the kcuf (read backwards) is asking you to celebrate? You not celebrating those festivals do not make any difference just like I do not celebrate your ethnic ‘festivals’ and it does not make any difference. If you do not like Gita or Puran who the kcuf (read backwards) cares? Don’t read it…thats your choice.

    And do not talk from yout ass! You find lots of these festivals (belonging to other culture) ‘worthless’, and you expect others to respect your culture.

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  6. Sorry guys if I seem offending your religion but why don’t u bother to think and feel frm our perspective whose cultures are always offended, neglected and mutilated.

    All I want to say that why people make such a fuss about hinduism.

    It is treated with highest priority whereas other cultures and other religions are overlooked and neglected.

    So u guys are so vulnerable about your religion but give a damn about other existing in your country.

    We are genuinely sick of only talking and listening about only your culture.

    There are other people and religions and culture existing in this country and before the hinduism itself.

    “THIS IS NOT A HINDU NATION”

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  7. Taaya,

    It’s all well and good talking about the different cultures and religions in this country, but what you fail to realise is that 80% or more of this country is made up of Hindus, and it seems to the majority that we are being held hostage by this minority politics especially by the maoists, through use of the gun. This is why it is important. It is a crucial time in the history of Nepal and all sections of society have to be included, whether they be the ethnic groups, women, maoists, royalists, Brahmins, Sherpas or even Tibetan refugees. I don’t think it is wise to ignore the majority and only pander to the minorities for what clearly looks like vote grabbing rhetoric from the side of the parties. I must insist that people should not take the majority for granted. This is why Hinduism is an important subject that is discussed frequently, as it is a religion followed by the overwhelming majority. The parliament may have announced us as secular and “NOT A HINDU STATE” but don’t make the mistake of believeing that the overwhelming majority are not HINDU and don’t make a further mistake by believing that a large portion of this majority feel overlooked at this moment in history.

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  8. Taaya,

    Do not get me wrong but the experience shows that its always the majority that rules and becomes a dominant culture. And perhaps the minority culture assimilates with the dominant culture. I have not seen minority ruling (except in Iraq under Saddam) where minority ruled and its culture dominated. He was Sunni whereas the majority of the country was Shia.

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  9. Plus, “not a Hindu state’ is yet to be decided in the Constituent Assembly elections…The declaration of the Parliament is only an intention, not a law as of now. As and when decision of CA regarding this issue is declared, whatever the decision may be, becomes the part of Constitution.

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  10. I agree that majority culture is dominant one and minority culture assimilates with the dominant culture.

    like the westernisation is overwhelming the world.

    But i am against the forced institutionalised ,impostition of hinduism practised by our state.

    that 80% statistics is the result of this imposition which is continuing to fall down.

    scoop : “but don’t make the mistake of believeing that the overwhelming majority are not HINDU and don’t make a further mistake by believing that a large portion of this majority feel overlooked at this moment in history. ”

    what a pathetic faith that a religion is overlooked when a nation is not made it’s pewa.

    Why do u guys narrow and underestimate your own religion?
    Why don’t you get out of this insecure mentality and let your religion free and flourishing.

    a Religion is bigger than a Nation and a Nation is bigger than a Religion !!!!

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  11. Taaya,

    Call it what you want, but it’s your voice against the majority. Our country is many a times run on petty politics and petty issues, and we know too well that these “pathetic notions” can result in not so pathetic and serious disturbances. To ignore the mentality whether it be worldly or pathetic and petty is plain stupid. The people here are like that, so the powers that be have to address problems likewise.

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  12. Taaya,
    Let me add that because of all these petty issues we have leaders like GP Koirala etc. on the helm and maybe not worldly wise people like you on the helm. Until this changes we have to unfortunately deal with the reality.

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  13. Any one who thinks that Hindus in Nepal are negatively discriminated on Nepal needs a serious reality check. Sure Hinduism is one of the great religions of the world. Those who want to practice and glorify it are free to do so. As someone who hates discrimination of any sort I am against a state religion. Not having a state religion does not necessarily mean you are not free to practice it. Kirats were never originally Hindu though they might have absorbed certain aspects of the religion over the centuries. But anyone who knows anything about Kirat culture and the way Hinduism is practiced in Nepal will know the disctinction.

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  14. Punks And freaks are destroying the monument of Late Prithivi Narayan Shah, and the freaking street everyday closed during office hour it’s a shame that our people don’t have common sense. cause in the end common sense prevails and they don’t have it most of them so we are in serious shit if u don’t like what prithivi naryan shah ypu probably are not nepali i reckon…. i have lived in lots of wetern country and felt the Democracy but nepal is country with people with dictator attitude only good solid leader can tame Us i don’t think democracy works for us this time unless we take our education to at least 75% of people. Our system can only create job for 35% of the people maximum so when 75% people are in ouster never a stable system so i guess we always need good security force and killings will be there if we want stable system. Sorry Nepali u just don’t have the money to be free…….thanks

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  15. The only legacy of PN Shah that I like and respect is the unification and creation of Nepal-don’t matter what the means were, it was the sign of those times. All the other legacies of PN Shah needs to be destroyed and forgotten.

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  16. “I have not seen minority ruling (except in Iraq under Saddam)”

    Actually there are many examples from history, with two somewhat recent ones being white rule in black South Africa and the 5% Catholic ruling minority over an overwhelmingly Buddhist South Vietnam. Education is usually the determinant.

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  17. “nepal is country with people with dictator attitude only good solid leader can tame Us i don’t think democracy works for us this time”

    I agree that Nepal desperately needs someone to step up and take charge at this time and restore order and rule of law before democracy can work. However, remember that for every Musharref or Tito there have been a hundred Hitlers and Stalins and Pol Pots.

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  18. Nepalese have the habit of know-it-all but the sad part is this- few of us who have been fortunate to have a decent education feel unless we copy, speak and do what the westerners do, we feel degraded.

    I see high ideals, good intent, and genuine concern for the country but to execute these, conditions must be made which is lacking. And I say answer is not the system change but the attitude and will to execute taking into consideration our own ability to absorb, not only foreign nor local, something that can find easy acceptance without the costly reeducation and radical change in our society.

    The blind acceptance of foreign ideas, rhetoric, or system is not the answer for our own and unique society. It is also not a call for xenophobia but a call to be strong from within whereby we can pick and choose the best for the country.

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  19. diehard-why all this stupid circumlocation? why don’t you just come out and state where your loyalties lie? I know it and you know it so cut the bull and be honest for once. You are the height of hypocrisy.

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  20. Bideshi, read about the army you want all Nepalis to support in the front page of today’s Kathmandu Post. Read the article properly and try to understand how bankrupt their culture and attitudes are.

    With any army like this who needs the Maoists to bring more trouble?

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  21. we Never had political problem in nepal we have economical problem for all the time since our country came to fore and people in plotics have always used economical crisis for their benifit and i think this will be the trend for all the time here in nepal. We even have to beg for the annual budget so i don’t know how out future is.

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  22. “HINDU BY THE GRACE OF GOD”
    “HINDU BY THE POWER OF BIRTH”
    My mother from whom i had milk is hindu.
    My Dad who gave me all he could is hindu.
    All My forefathers were hindu.
    so 90% of the country is hindu.
    This is A hindu nation make no mistakes fools.

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