Young Communist League Rally Against Gaur Killing

By Neil Horning

Part of a Nationwide rally of the YCL took place in Pokhara today. Office Secretary at the Maoist camp near Prithvichowk, Kiran Thapa, gave me a few words about the program. “This is a program against the Gaur violence. We demand the government investigate, and find out who is innocent and who is guilty. We are in favor of American people but against American imperialism. We are in favor of democratic Americans. People don’t have a good understanding of us. We are not traditional communists. We are in favor of Democracy. We heartily request all people to support our movement. We hope our movement will establish peace and a better environment all over the world.” [In Kathmandu, Jana Astha weekly reported on Wednesday, royalists unsuccessfully tried to infiltrate into Tuesday’s YCL rally in the city but police foiled their attempt.]

Asked if the Maoist were happy with the new ministerial posts Kiran said, “We are happy, but we want this government to have constituent assembly elections in 2064 BS. There are many journalists who do not have a good understanding of our party, and people who don’t understand much, believe them. Journalists who don’t look deep, think our local workers are in favor of violence, but they are only in favor of democracy and against monarchy. Please express to the world that the Maoists are in favor of real democracy. We are against Monarchy, Expansionism, and Imperialism. It is right to rebel. Rebellion is always a right. Under any government the people always have the right to rebel.”

The focus of the event might have been about the violence in Gaur, but the mood was definitely not. In contrast to the funeral march in Kathmandu, the Maoists at this function seemed a lot less angry, and much more enthusiastic. They were definitely having fun.

A speech at Prithvichowk to get everyone excited.

Many different Maoist organizations wear the YCL uniform. A group of Muslims from Miyapatan, about 3 km outside town was present.

Far right: An underage PLA member I interviewed in July of 2006, now wearing the YCL uniform, helps lead the chants. The YCL obviously includes ex-combatants

the 35-40% representation of women in other Maoist organizations continues in the YCL

At Mahendrapol a water fight erupted.

An appropriate choice of shirts.

Area in charge, Gyan Bhadur Koirala, oversees water distribution

District committee member, Com. Bishnu (Far Left), and an area in charge await their turn to speak.

Funs over, now clean up the flags

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67 thoughts on “Young Communist League Rally Against Gaur Killing”

  1. Neil,

    As you are closely tied with Maoism and Communism can you tell us when will Mr Prachanda and Mr. Baburam are going to implement those 40 points demands, they made against then government and started their armed struggle?

    Of course, it will not be easy for maoist to implement those demands. The first demand was to remova1 of 950 Nepal -India treaty. Do you think Maoist have enough courage to stand against India to implement their 40 points demands as out of them 10 points are directly related to India.

    Neil, you covered the story of YCL demanding action agaings Gaur’s killers pretty well. But where were you when maoist killed so many innocents at Madi? Where were you when Maoist looted villages, killed people and forced people to displace from their home ?

    And you JPT, keep your “J Payo Tyahi” comments with you. If you think you are good enough, then stop acting like those activists (so called HR activists) who make money out of every conficts.

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  2. A Nation of April Fools
    By Dr Chandrakala

    I had stopped writing disgusted at the gullibility of the so called articulate Nepalese class, the double standards as demonstrated by the lack of great concern at the death of more people in one day (including women) in Gaur than during the whole of the so called Jan Andolan and the approach of the international media who had all converged into Nepal as vultures and carrion eaters circling over a dying animal at that time, and now where are they.

    Reminds me of our great playwright Balkrishna Sama when he writes, ” Why do you want to light my pyre with the fire in my mouth, look, son! I am not dead yet.

    However, many readers sent e-mails and through different mechanisms reminded me that I had stopped writing. So I thought, even if a small section of the Nepalese both home and abroad are interested in reading about my frustrations, I would comply. Again Balkrishna Sama ” If I die and with one pint of my blood spilled it should result in a small patch of green in my motherland I would be content.

    Anyway, I restart. I believe we are a nation of April Fools. Till March 31st, there was breakdown of talks among the eight parties. DPM Amik Sherchan was fuming that he wasn’t consulted. But more important, the fight for seniority as to who would be No. 2 behind the ailing PM became a very serious issue and UML had a Central Committee meeting and firmly declared that if Sahana Pradhan was denied the second position in the hierarchy, UML would not be part of the interim government. Come April Fools’ Day, everything is okay.

    On the same day PM goes to attend SAARC Summit to pass a resolution against terrorism as the main agenda, with terrorists in his Cabinet. These terrorists were declared such by many countries including India with Red Corner notices by Interpol. What a joke?

    On the same day the Cabinet decides that the Constitution Assembly elections would be held on Ashad 6th (June 20th) when it is clearly stated in the Interim Constitution that Constituent Assembly polls would be held within the month of Jestha (Mar 15 – June 14), (as pointed out by Narayan Man Bijukchchhe, the Chairman of the Nepal Peasants and Workers Party). Anyway, what miracle is the government going to achieve in 6 days more of Ashad which they haven’t been able to achieve by the end of Jestha which was declared 10 months back.

    Moreover, the National Election Commission hasn’t been told far less consulted in this decision. And do the people know what is involved in Constituent Assembly polls? At least I am not clear, how it works out. Are they going to pull rabbits out of their hat? Anyway, what does it mean to say anyhow or somehow it has to be done. Why, for what purpose, if the exercise is not clearly comprehended by those who have to express their choices through that effort?

    On April 2nd, the Home Minister says nobody would be allowed to walk with weapons anymore as if till that day it was acceptable legally and nobody would be allowed personal bodyguards including the Maoist leaders. Those who have been practicing the above are his colleagues in the Cabinet and their leaders and co-workers. But the Home Minister is now firm and he is an honourable man. But let’s wait and see. Of all the districts, Kalikot is the scene of clashes between Maoists disturbing the district meetings and subsequent curfew on April 2nd. I wonder whether that is a good portent.

    Sadly, the political parties haven’t understood that through the Jana Andolan the people wanted democracy to be stronger not the political parties or their leaders (and their family members too.)

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  3. The two days after strong message from Mr.Sitaula, the maoist cardres shot bullet to one person in Biratnagar in the dispute. Government took two maoist in the custody. Now we have to see the drama of the Mr.Sitaula, what he is going to do with those two maoists??

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  4. JPT,

    You don’t take in what is written. I have no objection to Mr. Horning and his writings, further the rubbish you see in the blog with immature name calling and the like is upto UWB to moderate and remove if necessary. Ironically, you seem to be the one attacking everyone on this blog instead of making the “sensible” arguments you call for.

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  5. JPT,

    P.S. Why does one have to be a militant type etc. vs. a intellectual type to write here – why can’t one be just a normal individual? I believe most on this blog are just normal people and not revolutionaries, rebels or high intellects – like I had mentioned we are not in a high intellect forum here, this is just a blog.

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  6. Great article by Dr. Chandrakala. As the events have unfolded it seems like the political change / struggle is for political parties only. It’s like if somebody tries to snatch your job then you will do whatever possible to win it back. It is less about ideology or general public. The parties hate the king because he took their jobs away from them. They now are in love with Maoists because they helped parties get it back. The general people are more concerned about everyday things like law and order, water, electricity etc. So many lives have been wasted to fulfill the ambition of few. It’s all a drama. So frustrating.

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  7. The difference I find between Neil’s reporting and the rest is while others seem eager to highlight Maoists atrocities, Neil’s is often subtle which serves to conceal Maoists activities to an extent. So this leads to the bone of contention reflected here – Are the rest simply exaggerating or is Neil trying to conceal? Personally, since I am outside Nepal, I dont know. But from the reports, makes me think Neil is not quite getting it, having said which I dont think he’d have any stake in appeasing Maoists except the access and the glamour and career of reporting on the worlds most successful communist rebellion.

    Neil – Maybe our population finds it difficult to read between lines and find the real story behind subtelty but if neutral reporting is your aim, then I think you need to be more forthcoming.

    Otherwise I like your account by account reporting.

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  8. Let me make it a bit more clear. Let me start by how foreigners are perceived in Nepal. As like in most 3rd world countries, Americans especially easily manage to get attention here. People stand up and take notice – one because you are white, two (and more importantly) – because you are perceived as a 3rd party, a neutral observer.

    I am also aware how Americans take advantage of everything to further their career/interests, which I think is smart, and reporting on Maoists is a indeed a great niche for ticket to the ride.

    So what would a person like Neil in a different country trying to build a niche have in stake before him? One – while Maoists would want to keep him coz people view him neutrally, they’d expect him to tone down while reporting, else he wont get access. Two – he wouldnt want to piss them so he can continue doin what he’s been doing, moreover pissing Maoists doesnt achieve much anyway.

    Conclusion – hence I think its upto the readers to interpret. For my part, I read Neil’s reports only to update myself with chronicling of accounts, which I think is done well, and not for any intellectual bytes. Suggest rest to do the same instead of ranting unnecessarily.

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  9. Patriot: I couldn’t agree more. I also like to see what the Maoists are up to, how their cadres see things etc. And that is very important to understand where they are coming from. Too many bloggers here can’t come up one decent line of argument except to accuse Horning of being a terrorist.

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  10. Same here Bhudai – perhaps that is what is wrong with us Nepalese. We approach at things with too much pride and erudition that we fail to see the obvious since it means we need to at times agree with each other, which we dont want to do. We feel that by disagreeing and ranting inflamatory comments we stand out in the crowd. Instead of trying to explain and build consensus we jump the gun and utter nonsensical things. I am amazed to see majority of bloggers have held on to their dogmatic views since the first time they appeared in UWB while situation in Nepal has been changing almost every week.

    Abandoning our old beliefs accepting change means a fall of pride for us most Nepalese.

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  11. B,

    Why are you using my name. Cant you get another? It will be a bit confusing to have two posters with the same name dont you think?

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  12. Most of these bloggers are living abroad and they have not suffered from maoists autrocities. You have all you basic needs and now you have enough time to make comments and analysis on current situation of Nepal. Have you guys ever lost their loved ones because of maoist conflicts? have you guys ever paid forceful donations (in thousands ) to Maoists? Have your properties been captured by Moists? have your brothers and sisters brutally beaten by maoists when they refused to join their group?

    So, you guys all think that we nepalese are resistant to accept the changes, right? Mr Neil, you never ever tried to cover those hidden stories which you did not think ever happened to we villagers. I agree with some of the bloggers in this blog and sure they do have rights to ask you for you identity. Why dont you put some of your words to clarify yourself wether you are Hicks or Pearl?

    Bloggers, do not forget that we nepalese have suffered a lot and its our right to put our voice againt them.

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  13. nepali – I really empathise with you and respect your views. But if your response is related to my posting above, I want to make it clear that all I am saying is not give too much importance to Neil’s reporting except just for chronology of events. What would a guy in his situation do other than limit himself to cautious journalism? Besides its not that thousands of Nepalese reads his reports enough to get infuenced in anyway.

    Given his situation, I wouldnt say he’s be practising yellow journalism. Hes just here trying to make a career and nothing else. But whatever, his decision to stay here and give us insight into Maoists “other” side of life is worth praising. Lets just take it at face value and not attach too much to it which we know he cant offer.

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  14. While they are some that may seem to forgive maoists past, there are others who do not same goes for the state. There is a huge pshychological scar left with the insurgency and this should be adressed ASAP with the truth and reconcialiation council. I don’t see forgivers as great and non forgivers as normal, it really depends on the extent of the abuse and the current situation of the victims besides many other factors. It really does not matter but what matters is the process of healing and this will only come about when truth be told.

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  15. Even after the gory massacre in Gaur on March 21, the activists of Maoists and Madhesi Janadhikar Forum (MJF) have not stopped clashing with each other.

    Activists of MJF and Maoists have clashed and opened fire at each other in Ramgunj Belgachhiya of Sunsari district on Wednesday evening.

    One each activist of MJF and Maoists were injured in the incident. Reports say one Birendra Mandal of MJF was injured after Maoist activist named Bibek opened fire.

    Likewise, Maoist cadre Shambhu Sharma was injured after MJF activists thrashed him.

    Police have arrested two Maoist workers along with weapons. Bibek, however, is absconding. Even though Maoists have claimed that weapons belong to MJF, police say that they belong to Maoists.

    In a separate incident, two bombs were exploded in two places in Nepalgunj by unidentified persons.

    On Thursday night, the bombs went off, separately, in front of Laxmi theater and in Tribhuwan chowk. Blasts have not caused any damage, though, according to police.

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  16. It is good to see that young people in our country are involved in developing the nation towards republic which me and my lots of friennds support.However the league needs to focus on the other parts as well.
    There is going to be methadone program launched in Nepal.Methadone is a high class drug and they are doing it for their personal benifits rather than for the benifit of drug users.I would like you to investigate it as well and stop it before it ruins our Nepal society and the youth.

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