Subha Dashain!

Chacha hui!!! Girls Playing Ping

Chacha hui!!! Girls Playing Ping as Dashain Fever Grips Nepalis Pic by Suraj Kuwar

“[Delivery of ] the message that the meaningful [peace talks] have started would be the best gift that Seven Parties and the Maoists could give [to Nepali people].”

Pradeep Giri, Political thinker, in a Kantipur Op-Ed (Sept 29).

…..
And my heartfelt condolences to all the little hens, ducks, Bhedas and Chyangras along with the Khasi bokas in line to be murdered for food. A Dashain Blog

By Darshan Karki

It’s an uninhabited part of the city, so close to it yet so far from its hustle and bustle. Blue skies above and a vast expanse of green below, I could spend a lifetime staring outside the window or lying on the terrace below the cloudless sky.

The holidays have begun and what more it’s DASHAIN! And nothing can beat the experience of being in Kathmandu during this time of the year. Flower blossoms, the humming bees, birds flying in flocks across the blue skies and the perfect amount of sunshine, just enough to warm your skin. The feeling is plain Heavenly! Take a walk down the streets and you can see White Mountains peeping into the valley from their regular hideouts. It’s the capital at its best. Stop for a while to look around while crossing the road (even the busiest of traffic as in Baneshwore and Koteshwore) and the world of beauty unfolds. Kathmandu is the mélange of the Good, Bad and the Ugly. You walk beside the garbage dump while your eyes savor the sight of the mountains and the dark green painful hills. Can’t see any reason not to fall in love with this city 🙂

Writers are presumed to be loners. And if writer only means someone who makes sense out of his/her writing then I would prefer to be called an expressionist. It’s safer that way. Nevertheless I’m a loner too. Thereby the weather factor appeals more than any other aspect of the festival. But money matters are an equally appealing aspect too. Lucky to be a girl in Nepal, once in a while 🙂 Sadly no dashain for me this time as a relative passed away. So much for earning the extra “Do”. Even if it weren’t the case there wouldn’t be anything more than weather and money to look forward to in Dashain either

On the onset I happen to be a Veggie. So everywhere I go the same old question Of Why Did you Turn into a Veg? And the thing is I didn’t turn veg some months or even only 2-3 yrs back. I have been a veg since ages, God! I was only six. Still my darling relatives seem to have a very poor memory asking the same question again and again. If we had a dashain then would have surely given them my blog address to figure out the great reason. The other part is knowing absolutely nothing when it comes to cards. Of course I do know the “Jut Patti” game though. But tell me if there is anyone who loves to play that other than kids. No meat, no cards and no relatives my age too. Imagine my dashain.

And what about the shopping? It makes me roar with laughter. As a kid, I would cry, yell and throw a tantrum every time we had to go shopping. Now, I go out with Dhungz and anything I bring home is welcomed with a question: “What’s this, some new cloth to wipe the floor?” What respect of my shopping sense. I am still attempting to improve it. 🙂 Any tip is most welcome. If I buy a t-shirt for Rs. 600, my sister goes its worth only 200, if its something that cost only 200, she says only 100, that’s the maximum cost and if its 100 she goes: “wouldn’t have bought it even if it were only Rs 2”! And if the 100 thing is a surprise to you, don’t be this year every thing in town has gone really cheap. The purchasing power parity of us students has surely gone up. I bought a real cool jeans at mere 275 but “Say” told me she bought her pair at 190!!! I would surely love to know where she shops! Wear Cheap, think big and act smart: that’s my style. What’s yours? Not that I wouldn’t love to be a branded person but then a Reebok t-shirt for some thousand bucks! Yeso ganti heri haad nilnu paryo ni, kamai zero and luga chahin hero! That so uncool. But if you just can’t resist that lifestyle then head to “Bluebird Bird Mall” a new shopping paradise in town, over 60 or so branded shops. Haven’t been there though, just heard of it. Can’t afford a Price Induced Heart Attack, so young. 🙂

Moving on to the other aspect of Dashain is “Being with friends and relatives is the best part of festivals” cliche. To begin with “Being with friends” is a white lie, who doesn’t know friends will be busy with their relatives (in case both aren’t far from their families) and relatives, I feel as though I am forced to know them! It’s a lot easier dealing you people you chose to know isn’t it? But relatives are a compulsion,never an option. As kids you are the inseparables, but as time passes cousins turn into mere familiar faces. Where’s the fun in being together when all that you converse in your rare meetings is what you study, which year and then a sudden silence. Like a car coming to a screeching halt, knowing not where to head for or rather unwilling to go any further.

As kids we were crazy about a sister of ours, always yelling “…dijju” and all, then we went to hostel, barely saw her family, she went abroad, he went away too and now it’s only a “Lalmohan khane” place for us! The family bond isn’t so strong in nuclear families I guess. Sometimes I wish ours was a large family too, like a lot of Bahuni sathis I have hahaha… seems like the Bahuns (not trying to be ‘castist’ if the word exists as every “term” seems to erupt a controversy these days and the ambiguous meaning is always there) really yielded to that “Santan le Dadakada dhakos” blessing in dashain. They seem to have folks living all over the country, all parts of the capital, just everywhere. A fren of mine has over 1000 members in the immediate family tree!! So kool.. in my case I am the eldest grandchild in my maternal side, come 4-5th in the paternal side too. No one my age, and am not exactly great with kids too. And what more, I and my sister are responsible for naming any new kid born to my maternal uncles!! Have been doing the job since I was 10! Am working on the name of a baby boy at the moment too! Hahaha

Whatever the case, it’s Dashain so a compulsory time to Relax and have fun! So have the time of your lives flying kites, playing cards, drinking, dancing anything that makes you feel good. (I for one am enjoying these cool fast tracks in my stereo, can’t remember how many times I have jumped out of my chair for a dance as I write this entry.) And my heartfelt condolences to all the little hens, ducks, Bhedas and Chyangras along with the Khasi bokas in line to be murdered for food. Bohohohoohoh 😦 Not to forget the big eyed buffaloes all in the name of an Angry Goddess (apologies lord). Thank God these Non-Vegs haven’t moved on to eating the Vegs! Well, can’t say don’t eat em but don’t overeat to an extent that you can barely leave one place to put Tika in the other 🙂

Wish you all a very Happy Dashain and a Wonderful Ramdan!

Darshan maintains her personal blog: Zade Xpress

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19 thoughts on “Subha Dashain!”

  1. Happy Dashain hai sabailai,

    And yes Girija babu and Prachanda bhai have given us the sandesh of meaningful talks by talking contradiction just today.

    See this:

    Modalities of arms management postponed summit talks: PM Koirala

    Kantipur Report

    BIRATNAGAR, Sept 29 – Prime Minister Girija Prasad Koirala said on Friday that the much-awaited “summit talks” had to be postponed because a consensus could not be reached on the modalities of arms management.
    The summit talks that was supposed to be held today was postponed again following a meeting between the Prime Minister and Maoist Chairman Prachanda Thursday morning. Thursday afternoon, a meeting between the members of the government and Maoists talks team had formally decided to hold the talks on October 8.

    Talking to media persons at his hometown residence in Biratnagar, the Prime Minister said that the agreement on postponing the summit talks was made after his meeting with Maoist supremo Prachanda yesterday and it was decided that the summit talks would be held only after the issue of arms management is resolved.

    Prime Minister Girija Prasad Koirala also made clear that the upcoming round of summit talks to be held on October 8 will concentrate on the modalities of arms management.

    The Prime Minister apprised media persons that even the Maoist Chairman Prachanda was not in the view to dallying on resolving the problems. PM Koirala said that Prachanda also agreed on the principle that problems could not be resolved until the issue of arms management is given a conclusive end.

    Answering to journalists, the Prime Minister also claimed that he has not been pressurised by any foreign countries for the summit talks. PM Koirala said, “I am not a person who will work under anyone’s pressure and I don’t have any sort of pressure on me.”

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  2. Today there was a news that kidnapped boy Bibek Sharma was found dead near dhobikhola chabhil. Can you imagine how much the parents would have ? So our country has become already like Somalia. These leaders stay in protected area. GPK is the worst man till now. He can not do anything for peace. Prachanda and Baburam should be finished by some way out. Otherwise Nepal will linger in such a dangerous state for a decade or more. And it would be a failed state.I do not have faith in any leader. They are more interested in money.

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  3. Prof. Pyare Lall,

    The kid wasn’t just killed dammit, he was decapitated. And police say those sonoffabitches used knives and wires to cut the boy’s head off. CAN YOU IMAGINE? DAMN I’VE FORGOTTEN ALL ABOUT DASHAIN. C’MON BRING BACK CAPITAL PUNISHMENT AND HANG THOSE [icd] BASTARDS

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  4. I am very much anxious about my country. Police and military are not working well. Even they are collaborating with the killers and thieves. I can imagine the pain of the parents of the boy. He was a lovely boy of eight.

    I ask all the leaders to restore peace in the country. I am out of the country for a long time and I always think about my country.

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  5. While people are wishing for Vijaya Dasami, I like to wish United We Blog(our
    very own UWB) for successively completing 2 years journey of time.

    It would not be an exaggeration to say that UWB reflect democratic platform of
    expression and exemplary creativity of new generation. UWB family has really
    worked hard and today they must be full of joie de vivre that their work have been
    appreciated. But there are still number of significant milestones to mark.

    In this event, I kindly request UWB team to put light on some of the memorable
    events and experience. Besides, I am also keen in knowing the data since
    October 1, 2005 regarding the following

    1 total number of posts posted
    2 the post which received the most comment
    3 the post which received the least comment
    4 the name list of new budding genius to post the blog
    5 the number of political and non political posts
    and every possible statistical data analysis over this period of time.

    With all the best wishes to the young enthusiastic in their endeavour.
    Mona

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  6. refreshing write up amid the reeking political analysis…

    ‘As a kid, I would cry, yell and throw a tantrum every time we had to go shopping.’

    i think, i have seen you at ‘bisha bazar’ throwing your tanturm, you must have been that kid, i looked at you, and said– god what an unruly kid, you were crying river, stomping your feet and holding tight to the railings of the stairs, must have been a second floor, and your mother was trying to jerk you off the railings.

    if that’s you write to me, i do have some pictures of you throwing tanturms,

    yahoo@yahoo.com

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  7. How the 1990 Constitution was made

    (Courtesy: Dr. Dipak Gyawali)

    The piece below is being re-posted with the author’s consent. The content presents a review of the publication “Constitutional Development and the Constitution of the Kingdom of Nepal 1990,” by Senior Advocate Mukunda Regmi. This reviewed work was re-published by Mrs. Sita Regmi on the 9th of November, 2004. This review being highlighted here because it holds immense relevance to the debates that should be occurring, as the nation moves toward constituent assembly elections and onward.

    Senior advocate Mukunda Regmi was one of the members of the 1990 Constitution drafting committee from the Nepali Congress quota. Other members came from the Palace and the Left quota (including today’s Maoists in the persona of the late Nirmal Lama). Regmi has taken eight years to collect all the necessary documents as well as archival tapes and transcripts to produce this massive two-volume work which will stand as the seminal reference long into the future not only for scholars but also politicians and others debating Nepal’s governance.

    The first volume begins with the rarely available 1948 “constitutional arrangement” promulgated by Rana prime minister Padma Shumshere as well as discussions and statements related to it. It is followed by an account of the events and declarations related to collapse of Rana rule and the promulgation of the interim constitution of 1951. What is interesting in this account is how the author traces the origins of the “constituent assembly” concept that bedevils the debate in Nepal today to Nehru’s proposal and not to that of King Tribhuban, the Rana prime minister or the Nepali Congress.

    Much of both the volumes then consist of the account of the sixty meetings held by the 1990 Constitution drafting commission. These have been transcribed from the tapes preserved at the National Archives and can be verified by anyone so interested. They are supplemented with the author’s commentary essays on the matters raised in the commission meetings as well as some discussion of the previous constitutions. Since many of the other members of the commission as well as the interim cabinet of Krishna Prasad Bhattarai that ultimately finalized the draft are still alive and active in public affairs, Regmi’s opinions can be challenged by these eminences if they have digressed from the truth.

    The second volume also contains the 1958 and 1962 constitutions; but the commentaries associated with them, except for bringing to public domain the otherwise unavailable comments of Sir Ivor Jennings, disappoint on several counts. If 1990 was a “restoration” of the multiparty democracy of 1958, there is little explanation of its positive and functional features that needed retaining in the 1990 version. Also, if the aim of the new constitution in 1990 was to do away with the 1962 Panchayat system, it was essential that some of the positive features of the Panchayat that lasted all of three decades should have been better analysed and retained with improvements. Especially inexplicable is why the decentralized village and district units of governance of the Panchayat constitution were done away with in 1990 and not replaced by anything legitimizing local self-governance.

    These two volumes are exceptionally valuable for the documented response from political parties, civil society groups as well as the Nepal Army to the request from the commission for suggestions regarding the future constitution. They contain views and arguments on many issues still debated today, from the word ‘Hindu’ (which Regmi says refers to the king but not the nation which is de facto secular) to the question of provisions for a referendum (which those who today clamour for a new constitution seemed to be then against). Regmi mentions that the tapes containing the commission’s discussions regarding the army (its 44 th session) are currently missing from the archives; but he has provided invaluable service to future scholars by bringing the transcripts that were made then into the public domain.

    Valuable documentation is available on the two controversial “palace drafts” of the constitution that were at variance with what the commission produced, including the critical article in the official Gorkhapatra that made it public. What exactly transpired between the Palace and the interim Bhattarai government will probably known as more of the actors involved in the high drama bring forth their memoirs; but Regmi has clearly outlined the differences in the final constitution and the commission’s draft. While it is wholly understandable that the Palace would do everything it could to maximize its prerogatives, what is inexplicable are some of the changes introduced by the interim Congress-Left cabinet that so militate against a decent democracy.

    For instance, the commission’s draft had a provision (Article 120(2)) that required political parties to submit annual audited accounts to the Election Commission: it was removed in the promulgated version’s Article 113. The draft also envisaged an upper house that would not only have a significant voice in framing legislation, but also required that it have quotas reserved for three women, three dalits and nine marginalized janjatis not represented in the lower house. In the final constitution, the powers of the upper house were massively curtailed and only the quota for three women was retained.

    Similarly, given the massive controversy surrounding Article 126 of the constitution and the subsequent Tanakpur/Mahakali treaty, it is a surprise to learn that the original draft was more stringent: it required all such resource sharing treaties be ratified by a two-third majority. The promulgated version eases matters, allowing any government to do so with a simple majority if matters were not of “a serious, grave or long-term nature”. Sadly, in the twelve years that the parties concerned were in parliament, no attempt was made to define this provision, thus leaving water resources development cooperation with the lower riparian in a limbo.

    Regmi is strongest in the last chapter where he argues against a constituent assembly. First, everywhere in the world constitutions were made, not by representatives elected to draft them but by representatives elected to legislatures as happened in India under its 1935 Act. Second, the Nepali people have already given approval to this constitution by participating in three general elections under it, thus requiring no further popular endorsement. Finally, in all these three elections, no political party ever went to the people requesting a mandate to amend this constitution or any of its provisions.

    One only wishes Nepal’s political movers and shakers would listen to these arguments so that the rest of her citizens could move on with the country’s development.

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