Tag Archives: tourism

Nepal’s Annapurna Circuit and Kathmandu in New York Times and Time

sunrise on poon hill

Sunrise on Poon Hill, with a view of 26,795-foot Dhaulagiri. Pic: Ethan-Todras Whitehill for NYT

By Dinesh Wagle

The New York Times and Time magazine are working closely, so to speak, to cover Nepal in the past couple of weeks. First came Jim Yardley, former Beijing bureau chief of the Times now posted in New Delhi, with an analysis titled “China Intensifies Tug of War With India on Nepal.” That was in mid-February. Two weeks later Jyoti Thottam, Time‘s woman in New Delhi, saw, from Delhi, Nepal “Caught Between China and India.” [Prithvi Narayan Shah, the king who unified Nepal some 250 years ago, had realized that long time back when he said, “नेपाल दुई ढुङ्गाबीचको तरुल हो । [Nepal is a yam between two boulders.]”

Both stories are worth reading but they are not something that we can cheer about. This week NYT and Time came out with two travel reports that are certainly helpful to promote Nepali travel and tourism industry. The Times publishes an excellent travelogue from Annapurna Circuit while Time highlights Kathmandu Valley as a weekend destination. I was particularly interested in the Times story, by Ethan Todras-Whitehill, because I have done parts of the Circuit- Ghandruk Ghorepani (which counts as separate route that passes via Poon Hill) and Nar Phu trek (that touches many parts of the Circuit including Dharapani and crosses via Kang-la Pass that is only a few meters shorter than Thorang-la). The main photo- brilliant- published alongside the story- people enjoying the view of Dhaulagiri range and the sunrise- reminded me of my own moment at Poon Hill three years ago. Continue reading Nepal’s Annapurna Circuit and Kathmandu in New York Times and Time

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Attending A Maoist Mass Meeting in Pokhara

Maoists organized a massive rally and mass meeting in Pokhara a few days ago and Neil Horning attended with his camera. Here is his report:

When I told my classes I was taking a day off to go to Prachanda’s speech on March 8th. They asked “Why? You can’t understand what he says.” I didn’t really have an answer, other than it would be pretty silly to call myself a Maoist expert and not go. Needless to say, I now feel justified in attending. Much has been made about some of Prachanda’s controversial statements, but I haven’t seen much else covered. For those who want to know what actually happens at these events, the following is my account of the day. On the corner of Halanchowk, lakeside, the Hoteliers Union was getting ready. They had a band playing traditional horns. Continue reading Attending A Maoist Mass Meeting in Pokhara