Tag Archives: flag

Finally, Comrades Carry the National Flag

natinal flag of nepal and communists
Click to enlarge

By Mohan Buda Aer

While their leaders in the Constituent Assembly are working towards changing the national flag of Nepal angering millions of patriotic Nepalis all over the country, the Maoist guerillas yesterday not only carried and hoisted the Sun and Moon in a cantonment but also removed their party flag. The guerillas abandoned their party’s flag and opted for the national flag on an important day for them: the 15th anniversary of the People’s War in Nepal. The cantonment in Badaipur of Kailali district was decorated like a bride with the national flag and the People’s Liberation Army’s flag being hoisted at the distance of every 5 meters. The PLA had removed photos of the Maoist leaders as well.

“If any thing obstructs the integration process or the overall development of the country, we are ready to abandon that,” said co-commander Jeevan. “We removed the party flag respecting concerns at some quarters that putting the party flag makes the PLA affiliated to the Maoist.”

Well, that’s the the whole truth.  The PLA is still under Maoist control and they haven’t abandoned the Maoist philosophy and affiliation. The chief guest of the anniversary ceremony in this cantonment a central leader of the Maoist party. Politbureau member Lekh Raj Bhatta said that PLA was the strength of the Maoist party. “We are still under the party,” said co-commander Jeevan. “So, we haven’t abandoned party flag and photos of leaders formally.”

But the PLA didn’t play the Communist’s international song that they used to play in many such occasions. Instead, they played the national anthem and their own song.

Maoists want to change the national flag:

16 Sept 2009 – A fresh dispute over the national flag has erupted between the UCPN (Maoist) and the other parties. The main opposition Maoist party has been calling for the provision of a new model of national flag that should contain stars equal in numbers to the number of federal units after the restructuring of the state. The flag row surfaced at the sub-committee formed by the Constituent Assembly (CA). At the meeting, the UCPN (Maoist), the Rastriya Janamorcha, and the Dalit Janajati Party demanded that the country’s flag should be changed after the state restructuring.

However, the Nepali Congress, the CPN-UML, and the Nepal Majdoor Kishan Party have asserted that it is not necessary to change the national flag as it gives our national identity. Nepal’s current flag is the only national flag that is not rectangular.

The Maoists want to change the flag, believed to be up to 2,500 years old and which has a white moon and sun printed onto two red triangles, to reflect Nepal’s changed political reality. “The flag with the moon and the sun gives the reflection of the monarchy and cannot be the symbol of a multi-ethnic republic,” said Dev Gurung, a Maoist member of the constituent assembly. “The flag must be changed in the inclusive, proportional democratic republic,” he said.

[The debate about changing the national flag started on UWB long time before Maoists expressed their desire to do so in the Assembly. Check out this entry: On the National Flag of Nepal]

Meanwhile, the flag continues to represent Nepal all over the world:

Nepali national team marches in Vancouver Winter Olympics 2010
click to enlarge
Advertisements

On the National Flag of Nepal

Some Nepali people think the current national flag of Nepal, triangular and only such in the world, needs to be changed while others think it’s unique and it’s okay. UWB received an article by Prakash Bom about the necessity of the new flag and a photo of “a model flag for the People’s Republic of Nepal” from Shree Shrestha.

I wish the Nepali leaderships had spoken about the need of a new national flag for a new democratic Nepal before the elections of the constituent assembly. I dream of a national flag of the peaceful stars on the horizon of the summit of Sagarmatha (Mt. Everest) for new democratic Nepal. The number of peaceful stars will get derived from the restructuring of the state under the Federal Democratic government system.

First of all the people did not choose the current national flag, but accepted for granted as given by the feudal oligarchic regimes to lay the Hindu patriotic values. Many of us are caught up with its unique shape without realizing its connotations with the Hindu nationalism that sustains on the royalist values.

We have decided to change the national anthem (article on English). We have suspended the monarchy. We are about to print our national currency with the pillar of national glory – the Sagarmatha. It is time for new democratic Nepal to think over changing the national flag that can symbolize our true nationalism and the value.

Our nationalism rises up to the pinnacle of the Mount Everest and our national values and pride reach to the glory of Buddha, Ansubarma, Bhirkuti and Arniko. That is how Nepal has been recognized and appreciated in the world. On the glory of our true nationalism and pride we have to begin building our new prosperous democratic Nepal.

Our new democratic national flag must be able to embrace our diverse ethnicity, culture, religions, gender, and inhabitance of different geographical regions with the promise to guarantee our civil liberty and human rights; with the federal democratic electoral system for governing our constituents by the elected representatives from each constituent residence. We must transcend all impediments to create a flag of the nation, which can unit us all to serve the nation.

Current national flag of Nepal:

National Flag of Nepal

The national flag of Nepal (left) is the only non-quadrangular national flag, and one of only two non-rectangular official jurisdictional flags in the world (the other is the flag of the American state of Ohio). The flag is a simplified combination of two single pennants that represent, for some, the mountains of Nepal while for others the Hindu flags. The flag was adopted, with the formation of a new constitutional government, on December 16, 1962. The individual pennants had been used for the last two centuries and the double pennant since the 19th century.

The blue border denotes peace and harmony that has been prevalent in the country since the age of Gautam Buddha, who was born in Nepal. The crimson color is Nepal’s national color, and it indicates the brave spirit of the Nepalese people. The structure of flag has been the topic of great discussions in recent times, especially in the Constituent Assembly, as Maoists have expressed their wish to change the flag saying the triangles denote that Nepal is a Hindu Country. For them, Sun (surya) and Moon (chandra) denote the ancient Hindu rulers Surya Gupta and Chandra Gupta. It has been clear in the past several months (in late 2009) that overwhelming majority of Nepali people support the current flag arguing that the triangles represent Nepal’s world famous mountains and Sun and Moon symbolize eternal Nepal. Indeed, a very very popular song says:

Rato ra chhandra surya jungi nishan hamro
Jiundo ragat sari yo baldo yo shaan hamro

Jaba samma chhandra surya aakash ma rahanchha
Taba samma hunchha aafnai rato ragat yo hamro

[The red flag, with Sun and Moon on it, is symbol of our pride that shines just like the blood that flows in us.]

It’s true that triangular flag has been a Hindu symbol of victory since the time of Ramayana and Mahabharata. The depiction of celestial bodies represents permanence, the hope that Nepal will last as long as the sun and the moon. The moon symbolizes that the Nepalese are soothing and calm, while the sun symbolizes fierce resolve.