Maoists in India and Nepal

ब्लगमान्डू: राष्ट्रपतीय भ्रमणका अनौपचारिक कुरा

Many Indian newspapers today are filled with reports about the Indian police’s charge-sheet against Indian Maoist leader Kobad Ghandy containing a reference to a meeting with Nepali Maoist leader Pushpa Kamal Dahal Prachanda in 2006 as if Ghandy did a crime by meeting a leader who had, by then, left behind the underground politics for peace in Nepal. Nepali Maoists have obviously objected to the charge-sheet saying it had no relevance to the present situation. The question is: so what if Ghandy met Prachanda? They are both Maoists and its but natural for them to meet. When the meeting occurred, their parties were not declared terrorists by their respective states. Moreover, the biggest irony is, Nepali Maoists were in DELHI, New Delhi, even when they were the ‘most wanted terrorists’ in Nepal. India provided them with shelter. India brought the then terrorists Maoists of Nepal and other political parties together in Delhi to broker what became famous as 12-point agreement.

Delhi Police: Ghandy met Prachanda

The Delhi police on Friday filed a chargesheet against the banned CPI (Maoist) leader Kobad Gandhy saying that he had met Nepal Maoist chief Prachanda abroad and knew about the abduction and killing of Jharkhand cop Francis Induwar.

Filing the chargesheet before chief metropolitan magistrate Kaveri Baweja, the special cell alleged that Ghandy was involved in anti-national activities and was in Delhi to create a base for Maoist activities before his arrest in September last year. The police, in its 700-page chargesheet, informed the court that Ghandy had gone abroad to countries like Germany, Belgium and Nepal, where he met Prac-handa, to discuss the activities of his organisation. (contd.)

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Shyam Saran, Nepal expert, Quits Indian PMO

Saran’s exit marks the departure of the last Indian player in the Indian establishment who was behind the ground-breaking 12-point agreement that initiated the process of ending conflict in Nepal

By Dinesh Wagle in New Delhi
The Wagle Notes

shyam saran with nepali officials
Shyam Saran as India's ambassador to Nepal with Nepali officials in Kathmandu in 2004. Pic by Bikas Rauniar

Shyam Saran, former ambassador to Nepal and the man who once played a crucial role in Nepali peace process has on Friday (yesterday) announced resignation from the post of Indian Prime Minister’s Special Envoy on the India-U.S. nuclear deal and climate change. The Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) accepted the resignation to be effective from March 14.

Despite holding a position that has little to do with Nepali politics Saran is said to be providing his inputs on India’s Nepal policy informally because of his deep understanding of the Nepali politics. He hasn’t publicized the reason for resignation but news reports have speculated that he fell out with India’s pro-active Environment minister over India’s approach to international climate change negotiations. Some reports say he was unhappy with the latest development at the PMO that saw Shiv Shankar Menon, a former foreign secretary three years junior to him, elevated to the post of National Security Adviser to the PM with Minister of State status. Whatever the reason, Saran’s exit marks the departure of the last Indian player in the Indian establishment who was behind the ground-breaking 12-point agreement that initiated the process of ending conflict in Nepal. Continue reading Shyam Saran, Nepal expert, Quits Indian PMO