General Strike Day XVIII

Today’s protests saw infiltration of vigilantes while NC leader Girija Prasad Koirala and UML General Secretary Madhav Nepal have announced that they will attend a mass meet on Tuesday that will circle the Ring Road and make an announcement of capturing the inner parts of Kathmandu.

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No Entry Sign: Today’s strike witnessed incidents of loot in few places as well as vigilantes’s inflitrations. Pic by Bikas Karki

Evening Updates by Saroj and Deepak
Peaceful procession of around 10 thousand from Jorpati, Kapan and Mahankal arrived in Chabahil at 2 pm. Meanwhile, three vigilantes (one was Kiran Bista) tried to disrupt the peaceful protests. They hurled stones at the security personnel. The protesters immediately found out that they were not one of them. These vigilantes were beaten by protesters. They confessed that Inspector Pratap Gurung had sent them.

In another similar incident in Chabahil today, three vigilantes entered the mass and showed sword. They entered the house of Nhuchheman Manandhar when protesters tried to catch them. Protesters pelted stones at the house. But, he Human Right monitors and media persons prevented the house from further damage. The vigilantes told the protesters that they were sent by minister Nichhe Shamsher Rana.

Apart from these incidents, the protest in Chabahil largely remained peaceful. The protesters were 2 hundred meters away from curfew area. But, as the vicinity got tense, they moved 1 hundred meters back.

In Teaching Hospital, injured protesters, mainly from Gongabu clash, are undergoing treatment. Meanwhile RPP leader Pashupati Shamsher Rana paid visit to them. He condemned state ruthlessnes. Few protesters are eyes are injured resulting in their blindness.

Today, Lalitpur district saw massive protests. Mangal Bazar, Satdobato, Lubhu were the places of protests. similarly, in Kalanki, Shankhamul massive rallies were held and police fired rubber bullets and tear gas shell at the protesters. Continue reading General Strike Day XVIII

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Reading Nepal in American Media

Nepal coverage in US media is encouraging

By Dinesh Wagle, New York
Wagle Street Journal, American Edition

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Manish Swarup/Associated Press via The New York Times

Head of the wonderful American family that is hosting me in this alien land of New Jersey, half an hour drive from downtown New York City, was pleasantly surprised by what he saw on the front page of the New York Times. A big photo, actually four columns, with a boldfaced line under it: “Conciliatory Gesture by King of Nepal Does Little to Halt Violence.” Just below that line goes on the main body of the caption that explains the horrific photo to hundreds of thousands of Americans. “Police officers used clubs to break up an antimonarchy demonstration yesterday in Katmandu (Kathmandu as we spell). King Gyanendra said later that he would turn over power to a prime minister chosen by the political parties, but his statement seemed to bring little relief in the national crisis.” Then the Times wanted its readers to turn to Page A6 where there was yet another four-column photo with a six-column news story. The caption of the black and white photo read: “A photograph of King Gyanendra landed in a ditch yesterday with other items tossed there by demonstrators in Katmandu, the Nepalese capital”. The front page color photograph is credited to Manish Swarup/Associated Press where as the second one is clicked by Tomas van Houtryve for The New York Times. “It’s rare that I see Nepal on the front page of the Times,” my host said. (As I am writing this blog, I can see another report on Nepal is the leading news on the Times web site.) Continue reading Reading Nepal in American Media

Curfew Conundrum

A glimpse of how incessant curfew has made everyday life miserable.

By Deepak Adhikari

I was reading today’s The Kathmandu Post when my brother informed about the 9am to 8 pm curfew today. It was 8:45 am and there was no way I could be office within fifteen minutes. I could have driven my Hero Honda Splendor but there’s no fuel. So, at 10 am I took a meager meal. Meager because I was served only curry and rice without daal. I was also informed that we were running out of gas.

I dressed hurriedly and at 10:10 am took a walk to my office at Tinkune. I didn’t know how I will make it to the office, but somehow the zeal was there. I went to Anamnagar chowk. The security forces were non-existent. The road was empty; a girl was romping in the road with a kid, the latter’s mother was yelling them to go home. I took the road to Baneshor height. In the inner parts of city, life seemed normal; shops were open, people gathered and chatted about the latest political happentances. Continue reading Curfew Conundrum

Diaspora Demands Democracy

Nepalis living in the US have conveyed solidarity to ongoing movement back home

Nepalis living in the surrounding area of Washington DC organized protest in front of US Parliament building. Pics courtesy: Nepali Post

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Parties should not compromise: Journalists, lawyers and activists in Washington DC, April 21. Continue reading Diaspora Demands Democracy

The Talk of reconciliation…From Another Perspective

Note: UWB received this article in which the writer states, “Let us Reconcile and Transform the Movement into a New Height.” We at UWB strongly think that the peoples’ movement should intensify to give more pressure to the king. We are publishing this article here because we are demanding for democracy that ensures views from all quarters of a society.

By Raj Chettri

Reading the address of His Majesty King to the nation on 21st April 2006 one can palpably notice three points – transfer of executive power to the people, readiness to abide by Article 35 of the Constitution and invitation to Seven-party Alliance (SPA) for premiership. Article 35 of the Constitution is the fabric of the whole thread of constitutional monarchy and multi-party democracy. A true respect and enforcement of Article 35 can run democracy on to its full vigor.

But the SAP, civil society leaders and Maoist have dismissed the address of the King as a ploy. They have reiterated movement as the address is too little. The question that arises is what is enough? Continue reading The Talk of reconciliation…From Another Perspective

The Talk of reconciliation…From Another Perspective

Note: UWB received this article in which the writer states, “Let us Reconcile and Transform the Movement into a New Height.” We at UWB strongly think that the peoples’ movement should intensify to give more pressure to the king. We are publishing this article here because we are demanding for democracy that ensures views from all quarters of a society.

By Raj Chettri

Reading the address of His Majesty King to the nation on 21st April 2006 one can palpably notice three points – transfer of executive power to the people, readiness to abide by Article 35 of the Constitution and invitation to Seven-party Alliance (SPA) for premiership. Article 35 of the Constitution is the fabric of the whole thread of constitutional monarchy and multi-party democracy. A true respect and enforcement of Article 35 can run democracy on to its full vigor.

But the SAP, civil society leaders and Maoist have dismissed the address of the King as a ploy. They have reiterated movement as the address is too little. The question that arises is what is enough? Continue reading The Talk of reconciliation…From Another Perspective