Monthly Archives: November 2007

Why Guerillas Flee Maoist Camps?

By Binod Tripathi in the Kathmandu Post

Shaktikhor (Chitwan)- A year back, when the third division cantonment had recently shifted to Chitwan from Kamidada of Kavre district, then division commander ‘Sonam’ had informed media that a total of 8,300 PLA fighters were stationed in the camps. Six months later, when the United Nations (UN) verification team visited the cantonment, they registered just 6,100 guerrillas there. The Maoist leadership at third division is tight-lipped when it comes to the 2,200 People’s Liberation Army (PLA) combatants who vanished.

Bhunesh Chaudhary, a PLA deserter who now works as a motorcycle mechanic in Chitwan, has an answer. Chaudhary said that he and seven of his fellow combatants ran away from the cantonment after they saw no future inside the camps. “I had joined the Maoists out of peer pressure,” Chaudhary told the Post, “But I eventually escaped the camp.”

All of them are now working at an engineering workshop in Tadi Bazaar of Chitwan. They are also taking driving lessons to brace themselves for foreign employment. Upon being asked about combatants fleeing the camps, deputy commander of the third division Sanjeev said, “The number seems to have dwindled simply because commissars living here until last year have been deployed for other tasks.” But he was quick to add that rumors regarding the deserters are outright false. Meanwhile, deserters said that they have risked their lives after defecting from the party. (continue reading it here)

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Why Guerillas Flee Maoist Camps?

By Binod Tripathi in the Kathmandu Post

Shaktikhor (Chitwan)- A year back, when the third division cantonment had recently shifted to Chitwan from Kamidada of Kavre district, then division commander ‘Sonam’ had informed media that a total of 8,300 PLA fighters were stationed in the camps. Six months later, when the United Nations (UN) verification team visited the cantonment, they registered just 6,100 guerrillas there. The Maoist leadership at third division is tight-lipped when it comes to the 2,200 People’s Liberation Army (PLA) combatants who vanished.

Bhunesh Chaudhary, a PLA deserter who now works as a motorcycle mechanic in Chitwan, has an answer. Chaudhary said that he and seven of his fellow combatants ran away from the cantonment after they saw no future inside the camps. “I had joined the Maoists out of peer pressure,” Chaudhary told the Post, “But I eventually escaped the camp.” Continue reading

Republic Nepal or Monarchic?

Of course Republic because a hereditary king might not always be patriotic and qualified. A monarch, on the other hand, leads a life that does not resemble a common man’s. But Presidents or prime ministers are ordinary citizens until they get elected to public positions. They have different backgrounds, experiences, struggles and exposure to reality.

samyam wagle

By Samyam Waglé

The fate of a country is shaped by its group of leaders. It depends upon their vision, competence and beliefs. Iraq might not have been bombed as readily had there been Clinton or Carter instead of George W Bush. The world would probably not have seen the carnage if there were other than Hitler and Stalin. The Indian independence movement would have taken a different turn if Subhas Chandra Bose held sway over Mohandas Gandhi. Britain would have been different without Churchill’s leadership during the Second World War. Seven million innocent Cambodians would not perhaps have perished if there was no Pol Pot. China’s rise today was shaped by the destiny that Mao defeated Chiang Kai-shek, and the way a purged Deng Xiaoping claimed power after Mao. It was on the will of these people that drafted the fate of the country. It might have been something else, worse or good, had there been other. It is thus amazing that the fate of country depends upon the leader and also relies upon its political system. Continue reading

Republic Nepal or Monarchic?

Of course Republic because a hereditary king might not always be patriotic and qualified. A monarch, on the other hand, leads a life that does not resemble a common man’s. But Presidents or prime ministers are ordinary citizens until they get elected to public positions. They have different backgrounds, experiences, struggles and exposure to reality.

Samyam WagleBy Samyam Waglé

The fate of a country is shaped by its group of leaders. It depends upon their vision, competence and beliefs. Iraq might not have been bombed as readily had there been Clinton or Carter instead of George W Bush. The world would probably not have seen the carnage if there were other than Hitler and Stalin. The Indian independence movement would have taken a different turn if Subhas Chandra Bose held sway over Mohandas Gandhi. Britain would have been different without Churchill’s leadership during the Second World War. Seven million innocent Cambodians would not perhaps have perished if there was no Pol Pot. China’s rise today was shaped by the destiny that Mao defeated Chiang Kai-shek, and the way a purged Deng Xiaoping claimed power after Mao. It was on the will of these people that drafted the fate of the country. It might have been something else, worse or good, had there been other. It is thus amazing that the fate of country depends upon the leader and also relies upon its political system.
Depending on how one views the “great man view of history,” the debate on the merits of a presidential system vis-à-vis a monarchical one is steered. A king making policy and thinking for his country is very different from the way an elected figure would. They have different time horizons for implementing their vision – unlike the politician, the king doesn’t have to worry about the next elections, and hence his actions could in theory be in the longer-term interest. Continue reading

The 'Voting Day' Demand: Declare New Election Dates

Had Maoists not gone mad and pulled out from the government, we would be voting today to elect the Constituent Assembly that would abolish the monarchy from Nepal and bring out new constitution. Election didn’t happen because Maoists were afraid of their possible pathetic loosing in the elections. Holding of CA elections is one of the key parts of the peace process that officially began with the signing of the peace agreement (which celebrated its first anniversary yesterday) and it’s not unusual that without the participation of the one side of the peace agreement, no election can happen. If Maoists are serious enough to give a conclusive end to the peace process, they must not hesitate to go to the election which will provide further bases for the peace process itself.

Maoists should stop their republic-first-then-only-elections rots and join forces the other parties in the Six Party Alliance to declare new dates for the elections. This is the only way forward. The petty political talks of changing the government leadership (from NC to UML) and mass street agitations will not help the progressive and democratic republic forces in Nepal.

Happy Birthday Peace Agreement! May You Live Forever :)

Welcome to the Second Year Romance while we remember that rejuvenating day last year.

THE WAR IS OVER, NEPAL DECLARES!

Less than a minute ago, amidst a grand and historic ceremony, Nepali leaders agreed to end the war that killed more than 13 thousand people in the last 10 years. Prime Minister Girija Prasad Koirala and CPN Maoist Chairman Prachanda put their respective signatures in the Comprehensive Peace Agreement that formally ended the bloodshed in Nepal. The signature ceremony is being telecast live and it has been reported that people have started celebrating the historic achievement.
UWB post dated November 21st, 2006

Prof. Pyare Lall, on November 21st, 2006 at 9:05 pm Said:
It is a very big achievement. But let us see the implement from both sides particularly from Maoists. Let us wait and see.

Truth, on November 21st, 2006 at 9:11 pm Said:
A very good thing for Nepal and whole the Nepalese for the better future of the Nation.
Love Live Nepal !!

photoredde, on November 21st, 2006 at 9:22 pm Said:
So many times, especially when it comes to wars, what is said and what is done are often two very different things. I agree with Prof., let us wait and see… yet I am very excited for you and all the other Nepalis that have been effected for all of these years. I will be crossing my fingers for the future of Nepal.

Continue reading

Headlines: The Great Mistrust Between Congress and Maoist

The growing mistrust between Nepali Congress and CPN Maoist, and the ‘neither-this-side-nor-that-side’ policy of the CPN UML are the main reasons of the current political impasse that, it seems, will not be easily solved in the regular session of the parliament that will start tomorrow. UWB presents the headlines and news snippets related to the current crisis that are as varied as the voices and arguments within the six party alliance that appears to be on the edge of the break up (click on the headlines to read in detail):

Parties intensify discussions to end deadlock

Maoists step up pressure campaign

KATHMANDU, Nov 18 – The political parties have intensified intra- and inter-party discussions Sunday afternoon in bid to find a consensus among them to implement the motions endorsed by the special session of the interim parliament, seeking an arrangement for declaring the country a republic and adopting an all-out proportional system for the Constituent Assembly elections before the winter session of the House begins on Monday.
The Nepali Congress (NC) is holding its parliamentary party meeting at the official residence of the Prime Minister in the run up winter House session.

No alternative to implementation of House motions: Speaker

KATHMANDU, Nov 18 – Speaker Subash Chandra Nemwang Sunday said that there is no alternative to implement the motions on a republic and a fully proportional representation system passed by the special session of the interim parliament. Continue reading

Nepal Heading to New Crisis: No CA Without Executing House Resolutions

a report by Conflict Study Center
Contributed by: Bishnu Pathak, PhD and Chitra Niraula

“The whole nation is heading towards a republican system, and the wave of sensation in support of a republican set up has arrived at the point of diffusion.” Prime Minister Girija Prasad Koirala

Background: On the evening of November 4, at 7.55 PM, the Interim Parliament (IP) decided to go for federal democratic republic set up prior to the Constituent Assembly (CA) elections and for fully proportional election system by a simple majority voice vote. The IP endorsed the Communist Party of Nepal (UML) amendment proposal of republic and the CPN (Maoist) proposal of fully proportional election system (FPES). The Maoists withdrew their urgent public importance proposal of immediate declaration of republic from the IP and supported the UML’s proposal in the interest of working unity amongst the communist factions. In turn, the UML supported the Maoists proposal of the FPES. The Rastriya Prajantra Party (RPP) also supported the Maoist’s motion on the full proportional representation but voted against the motion for republican setup. Continue reading

Mr Chairman, CA Is More Important Than Republic

By Dinesh Wagle
Wagle’s Web Log

I am a diehard republican but I am dead against Maoist Chairman Prachanda’s views that proclamation of republic is more important than holding the Constituent Assembly elections. I have been saying in these columns that, yes, republic is a very important issue but it can’t be the alternative to the CA elections. Is Prachanda saying that we don’t need CA elections if Nepal is declared a republic? If yes, I don’t want a republic order at the cost of CA elections. When we talk about declaring Nepal a republic, we are talking about that only, nothing more. But the CA election doesn’t only include the republic agenda but also address many more issues that need to be dealt with. In addition to the republic agenda, the CA election is also about bringing out a new, inclusive constitution and restructuring of the state of Nepal. Continue reading

Nepal in UAE: Experience of a Nepali Worker

Nepalis have very good reputation here in the UAE. If we can have the balance of hard work and talent, no other nationals can beat Nepali workers in the labor market

By Sudip Adhikari

I have been working in United Arab Emirates for the past seven years. Before coming here in this rapidly developing country (many of my friends and) I used to think that the gulf countries didn’t have anything other than oil. That impression has changed. I have learned something new while working in the Middle East (or West Asia) and seeing the way my host country is doing phenomenal progress in economy. UAE has become an example in Asia that if the governments have the strong will power anything is possible to bring in a new era in a country. Let us not forget that, to achieve such progress, this country is getting hard work support from thousands of Nepali nationals. Continue reading